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First-year Courses

    • 101.  Literature and Composition (I and II; 3, 0)
      Introduction to the critical study of literature and instruction in composition. First-year students only; others by permission of the instructor.
    • 106.  Literature and Creative Writing (I and II; 3, 0)
      Introduction to creative writing through the reading and writing of poetry and prose (fiction or creative nonfiction). Does not count toward the creative writing concentration or minor. Prerequisite: seniors by permission of the instructor.
    • 107.  Introduction to World Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      This course introduces students to literary works from several countries, covering five continents and many cultures. It also provides instruction in composition. Prerequisite: first-year students only; others by permission.
    • 109.  Public Speaking in the 21st Century (I and II; 3, 0)
      Introduction to public speaking, with a focus on historical speeches. Study and practice of speech writing and organization, verbal and nonverbal communication.
    • 120.  Literature and the Environment (I; 3, 0)
      Interdisciplinary study of major texts which demonstrate an abiding interest in nature and in cultural and social values concerning the environment.
    • 130.  Introduction to Film/Media Studies (I or II; 3, 0)
      Introduction to film grammar, history, genres, and movements using theoretical texts and primary source films. Emphasis on critical thinking skills through video essay projects.
    • 150.  Art, Nature, and Knowledge (I or II; 4, 0)
      An interdisciplinary study of selected works in art, music, literature, science and philosophy from European Renaissance through the early 20th century. Crosslisted as HUMN 150.

General Literature Courses

    • 198.  Ways of Reading (I and II; 3, 0)
      Introduction to literary creation, criticism, and theory, with emphases on reader/writer; text; context; and identity.
    • 199.  Survey of English and American Literature (I and II; 3, 0)
      A survey of major authors, texts, concepts, and developments in English and American literature with participation of weekly guest lecturers from the English Department.
    • 217.  Studies in Dramatic Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Selected movements and topics in drama such as Restoration drama, African-American dramatic literature, the Theatre of the Absurd.
    • 218.  Studies in Children's Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Fairy tales, fantasy, animal fables, and tales of adventure from 19th-20th centuries, with a sampling of contemporary films, primarily American.
    • 220.  Young Adult Fiction (I or II; 3, 0)
      Study of literature that appeals to adolescent and young adult readers, with particular emphasis on British and American fiction and non-fiction prose from the 19th century to the present.
    • 224.  Visions of the Susquehanna (I or II; 3, 0)
      This course examines literature of the Susquehanna Valley. Crosslisted as ENST 224. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 225.  Susquehanna Country (AI or AII; 2, 3)
      Interdisciplinary studies in environment, philosophy, literature and communities of the Susquehanna region. Crosslisted as ENST 225 and HUMN 290.
    • 226.  Irish Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Introduction to Irish literature, with attention to Irish mythology, history, and politics as they affect Irish art.
    • 227.  Caribbean Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Introduction to selected literature of the Caribbean, with close analysis of text and context.
    • 230.  Nihilism, Modernism, Uncertainty (I; 3, 0)
      An interdisciplinary study of major texts, figures, and concepts of the 20th century. Designed to follow HUMN 128 and HUMN 150. May be crosslisted as HUMN 250.
    • 275.  Greece and Turkey: East and West (S)
      This course is based around a three-week summer study abroad experience in Greece and Turkey. Themes and materials will vary from year to year. Prerequisite: interview prior to admission. Crosslisted as CLAS 275 and HUMN 275.
    • 280.  Modern Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      A selective introduction to the varied forms, significant authors, and literary movements from the turn of the century to the recent past.
    • 282.  Modern Poetry: Rilke and Eliot (AI or AII; 3, 0)
      A close study of two major modernist poets, Rainer Maria Rilke and T.S. Eliot, whose work shaped generations of writers.
    • 286.  The Modern Novel (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Selected major novelists (English, Irish, continental, American).
    • 287.  Modern Drama (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Studies in modern dramatic literature, theatre history, and performance theory.
    • 288.  Studies in Contemporary Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      An intensive study of selected British and American authors of the past 40 years.
    • 290.  Special Topics (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Flexible in subject matter and in method. Topics such as Literature and Psychology, Literature and Myth, Science Fiction.
    • 291.  London in Literature (AI or AII; 3, 0)
      How London's urban realities shape the literary imaginations of writers and readers, and how their imaginative visions shape our perceptions and experience of London. Only offered in London on occasion.
    • 294.  Literary Arts Administration and Editing (I or II; 3, 0)
      Focused on literary arts administration and editing, this course is particularly useful for students interested in careers in the world of arts administration and/or publishing. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 297.  The Teaching of English (I; 3, 0)
      Discussion and practice related to the teaching of English in secondary schools. Required for 7th to 12th grade certification in English.

English Literature Courses

    • 240.  Medieval English Literature to 1485 (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Survey of the poetry and prose of medieval England.
    • 241.  The Green World (I or II; 3, 0)
      An examination of the roots, contexts, and major texts of early British literature with emphasis on views of nature and subjectivity from an ecocritical perspective.
    • 243.  Chaucer (I or II; 3, 0)
      The major works and language of Chaucer.
    • 244.  Elvish Writing: Chaucer, Spenser and Early Phenomenology (I or II; 3, 0)
      Major works of Chaucer and Spenser examined in the context of early Insular poetic traditions of intersubjectivity.
    • 250.  Renaissance Literature, 1485-1660 (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Survey of the poetry and prose of representative authors, including Spenser and Milton.
    • 251.  Studies in Renaissance Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Selected major prose and poetry.
    • 257.  Shakespeare (I or II; 3, 0)
      Selected plays.
    • 258.  Studies in Shakespeare (I or II; 3, 0)
      Studies in such special topics as ''Shakespeare and Film,'' ''Shakespeare's History Plays,'' ''Psychoanalysis and Shakespeare.''
    • 260.  Restoration and 18th-century Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Survey of the poetry and prose of representative authors.
    • 261.  Studies in Restoration and 18th-century Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Selected authors and various genres, including the relationship between literature and politics, history, and the sciences.
    • 263.  Sex and the Single Heroine (I or II; 3, 0)
      Introduction to the 18th-century novel, focusing on issues of gender, sexuality, and class, in a wide range of novels and contemporary conduct books. Crosslisted as WMST 263.
    • 270.  Romantic Literature, 1780-1832 (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Examination of selected authors in poetry and prose, read in relationship to contemporary political and cultural influences.
    • 271.  Studies in 19th-century English Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Selected major prose and poetry.
    • 283.  The Early English Novel (I or II; 3, 0)
      The rise of the novel as a genre, and analysis of representative novels.
    • 284.  The 19th-century English Novel (I or II; 3, 0)
      Major developments in the novel as a genre and representative novels.
    • 285.  Modern British and American Poetry, 1890-1960 (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Selected major poets of England, the United States, and other English-speaking cultures.
    • 289.  Theatre in London (I and II; 2, 3)
      This course is offered off campus in London through the Bucknell in London program. Introduces students to all aspects of the London theatre. Crosslisted as THEA 264.

American Literature Courses

    • 205.  Early American Colonial Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Study of American literature from Columbus through the American Revolution.
    • 206.  Early American National Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Study of American literature from the Revolution to the Civil War.
    • 207.  American Romanticism (I or II; 3, 0)
      Examination of selected texts in various genres, read in their cultural contexts.
    • 208.  American Realism and Naturalism (I or II; 3, 0)
      Study of selected texts by American writers from 1865 to 1900.
    • 209.  Modern American Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Study of selected texts by American writers from 1900 to 1950.
    • 211.  Southern Exposure (I or II; 3, 0)
      Twentieth-century literature of the American South. Probes the legacy of a culture that celebrated honor, but was built on slavery. Crosslisted as WMST 212.
    • 212.  Contemporary American Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Study of selected texts by American writers from 1950 to the present.
    • 213.  Special Topics in American Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Selected special topics in American literature.
    • 216.  Studies in American Literary Genres (I or II; 3, 0)
      Study of a selected genre of texts in American literature.
    • 219.  Studies in Selected American Authors (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Authors selected from among Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, Cather, Melville, Wharton, James, H.D., Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, O'Neill, Stein, Welty, O'Connor, and Morrison.
    • 221.  African-American Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Introduction to selected texts founded upon the Black experience in America.
    • 228.  Gender and Sexuality in America (I or II; 3, 0)
      Literature and popular culture exploring such topics as construction of gender identities, sexualities, GLBT cultures and gender-based violence. Crosslisted as WMST 228.
    • 268.  Jewish-American Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Examines the literary and cultural production of American Jews through the study of diverse series such as novels, short stories, plays and film. Crosslisted as UNIV 268.

Literature Seminars

    • 300.  Seminar in Literary Theory and Criticism (I; 3, 0)
      Advanced study of literary and critical theory, research, and other elements of literary scholarship. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 301.  Seminar in American Literature Topics (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Advanced topics, such as Cross-Cultural Encounters, The American Novel, Gender and American Poetics, and Beat Generation. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 302.  Seminar in Selected American Writers (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Study of the works of one or more major American writers. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 305.  Seminar in Early American Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Seminar in a special topic or genre of Early American and/or 18th-century American culture. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 306.  US: Fever/Fantasy/Desire (I; 3, 0)
      Seminar on American literature between 1770-1861 with an emphasis on psychoanalytic approaches to literary and cultural study. Authors may include Brown, Sansay, Poe, and Melville. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Crosslisted as HUMN 306.
    • 307.  Seminar in 19th-century American Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Seminar in a special topic, author, or genre of 19th-century American literature and culture. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 310.  Seminar in Modern American Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Seminar in a special topic, author or genre of modern American literature and culture. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 311.  Seminar in Contemporary American Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Seminar in a special topic, author, or genre of contemporary American literature and culture. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 315.  Unsettling Memories (I or II; 3, 0)
      Cultural analysis of unsettling, historically powerful racial ideas about purity and pollution written on the "lady's" and "black" bodies in 20th-century Southern fiction and photography. Crosslisted as WMST 315.
    • 319.  Individual Projects (I and II; R)
      Individual special projects supervised by instructor; honors thesis. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 321.  Seminar in African-American Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Study of selected thematic, aesthetic, and ideological issues in Black American writing. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 326.  Seminar in Irish Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Advanced topics in Irish literature, including Irish Women Writers, Nationalism and Literature, and Contemporary Irish Writing. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 327.  Seminar in Caribbean Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Study of selected thematic, aesthetic, and ideological issues in Caribbean writing.
    • 340.  Seminar in Early English Literature to 1485 (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      The language and literature of Anglo-Saxon or medieval England. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 341.  Seminar on Ecocriticism and Ecosemiotics (AI or AII; 3, 0)
      This seminar will focus on research and discussion of ecocritical and ecosemiotic approaches to literature. Crosslisted as ENST 341.
    • 350.  Seminar in Renaissance Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Special topics. Student reports, oral and written. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 358.  Seminar in Shakespeare (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Special topics. Student reports, oral and written. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 360.  Seminar in Restoration and 18th-century Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Studies in canonical and marginalized texts, cultural and philosophical formations, and the continuing historical and theoretical relevance of the period. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 361.  Law and Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
      Studies in the relationship between law, narrative and social and fictional forms in the 18th century and modern Britain and America as these raise questions about identity, justice, historical powers, God, and the nature of civil obligations.
    • 370.  Seminar in 19th-century English Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Examination of a wide range of poetry and prose by selected authors with emphasis given to the literature's historical and cultural groundings. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 378.  Thesis Workshop (I; 3, 0)
      A colloquium on problems arising from the writing of a scholarly thesis. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 379.  Senior Thesis (II; 3, 0)
      The writing of a scholarly or creative honors or senior departmental thesis. Students must confer with and submit a proposal to an adviser prior to registering for the thesis. Prerequisites: senior status and permission of the instructor.
    • 382.  Seminar in Contemporary Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      A selective study of the most recent developments in English and American prose or poetry. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 391.  Seminar in Poetry (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      A study of poetry as a genre and an analysis of the work of selected poets. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 392.  Seminar in the Novel (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Special topics. Student reports, oral and written. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 393.  Seminar in Contemporary Drama (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Special topics. Student reports, oral and written. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 394.  History of Sexuality (I or II; 3, 0)
      A cross-cultural and interdisciplinary examination of the signification of sexuality in literature, philosophy, scientific discourse, and the visual arts. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Crosslisted as HUMN 320 and WMST 325.
    • 397.  Seminar in Special Topics (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Topics such as comparative literature, literature and the arts, queer theory, or satire. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 398.  Issues in Literary/Critical Theory (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Advanced topics in the study of literary and critical theory. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 399.  Seminar in Cultural Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Introduction to significant issues and debates characterizing the field known as Cultural Studies. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

Courses in Creative Writing

    • 202.  Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (I or II; 3, 0)
      Principles of writing fiction, with constant practice. Designed for students planning to concentrate or minor in creative writing. Preference given to juniors, sophomores, and first-year students. Prerequisite: seniors by permission of the instructor.
    • 203.  Introduction to Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction (I or II; 3, 0)
      Theory and practice of creative nonfiction, including travel writing, memoir, and other forms. Designed for students planning to concentrate or minor in creative writing. Preference given to juniors, sophomores, and first-year students. Prerequisite: seniors by permission of the instructor.
    • 204.  Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (I or II; 3, 0)
      Principles of the writing of poetry, with constant practice. Designed for students planning to concentrate or minor in creative writing. Preference given to juniors, sophomores, and first-year students. Prerequisite: seniors by permission of the instructor.
    • 210.  Special Topics in Creative Writing (I and II; R; 3, 0)
      Studies in such special topics as prosody, stylistics, characterization, or narrative theory. Course emphasizes formal or structural elements within particular genres and an appreciation of craft from a writer's perspective. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 229.  Ecopoetics (II; 3, 0)
      An exploration of poetry as site-specific ecological practice. Intended for students interested in both Creative Writing and Environmental Studies. Prerequisite: ENGL 204 or permission of the instructor. Crosslisted as ENST 227.
    • 303.  Seminar in Writing Creative Nonfiction (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Advanced workshop in writing of creative nonfiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 202 or ENGL 203 and permission of the instructor.
    • 308.  Seminar in Writing Poetry (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Advanced workshop in writing poetry. Prerequisites: ENGL 204 and permission of the instructor.
    • 309.  Seminar in Writing Fiction (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Advanced workshop in writing fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 202 or ENGL 203 and permission of the instructor.

Courses in Film Studies

    • 231.  Pre- and Early Cinema (I or II; 3, 0)
      Traces cinema's technological ancestors and examines film's profoundly different possibilities and alternatives prior to 1918. Weekly screenings illustrate cinema's various functions in its earliest years.
    • 232.  Film History I (I or II; 3, 0)
      World cinema history from 1918 to 1945. Weekly screenings.
    • 233.  Film History II (I or II; 3, 0)
      World cinema history from 1945 to present. Weekly screenings.
    • 234.  National Cinemas (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Concentration on the history and style of a particular national cinema. Weekly screenings.
    • 235.  Gender and Film (I or II; 3, 0)
      Current debates about gender and American film, from WW II to the present. Diverse critical approaches for interpreting film within the broad context of gender studies.
    • 238.  Special Topics in Film Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Examination of a specialized topic in film studies. Weekly screenings.
    • 332.  Seminar in Film and Technology (I or II; 3, 0)
      Traces technology's impact on film form and content. Topics include early cinema, sound technology, widescreen, and computer-generated images. Weekly screenings. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 336.  Seminar in Film Genres and Auteurs (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Examination of a particular genre (film noir, Hong Kong action movies, Westerns, etc.), director, cinematographer, screenwriter, or producer. Weekly screenings. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 337.  Seminar in Film Theory (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      Survey of approaches to film analysis and critique, ranging from realist/formalist debates to psychoanalytic, feminist, and semiotics approaches. Weekly screenings. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
    • 338.  Special Topics in Film/Media Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      This course covers specialized, rotating topics in film/media studies. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    • 339.  Film/Video Production (I or II; R; 3, 0)
      This course applies film theory concepts to advanced video/audio production through a range of hands-on production assignments. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
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