Awarding degrees is based on requirements established by the faculty. The faculty also has adopted additional rules and policies related to those requirements that support the standards and the integrity of Bucknell and its academic program.

Degree and Graduation Requirements

Quantitative: Every candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Bachelor of Science in Education, or Bachelor of Music must earn credit for 32 courses, while every candidate for a degree in the College of Engineering must earn credits for 34 courses including four half courses. Every candidate for the combination degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the branches of engineering and Bachelor of Arts must earn credit for 42 courses.

Curricular: Every candidate for any undergraduate degree must complete the curricular requirements as specified for the degree, including major requirements, major related requirements, general education requirements (i.e., the provisions of the College Core Curriculum for students in the College of Arts and Sciences), and the University writing requirement. Substitution for, or waiver of, any requirement must be approved in advance by the dean of the student’s college.

Grade Point Average: Every candidate for a bachelor’s degree must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.00. In addition, every candidate for an engineering degree or for the combination degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the branches of engineering and Bachelor of Arts must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 for all courses in the College of Engineering.

Academic Policies and Requirements

Degrees and majors: It is possible to receive only one undergraduate degree from Bucknell at a time; that is, each degree requires the fulfillment of all requirements and the full 32 (for Arts and Sciences and School of Management), 34 (for Engineering), or 42 (for the combined Engineering/Arts degree) course credits. It is possible, however, to formally declare a second major, even if that major is from another degree program. If declared, the pursuit and successful completion of the second major, even if from another degree program, will be noted on the student’s academic record (transcript). If the two majors are in different degree programs, the student can choose which degree to receive, but can receive only one degree.

Many classes at Bucknell University meet for three scheduled hours of instruction per week. A number of classes also have scheduled contact hours beyond three per week. Courses are equivalent to four semester hours or six quarter hours because they include scheduled, faculty-supervised activities (such as labs, service learning, common hours, etc.) and/or intensive, iterative faculty involvement in student performance and achievement with independent or small-group student work (such as writing assignments, problem sets and problem-solving activities, student performances in the arts, student creative work, etc.). Courses at Bucknell that receive one unit of academic credit have a minimum expectation of 12 hours per week of student academic engagement. Student academic engagement includes both the hours of direct faculty instruction (or its equivalent) and the hours spent on out-of-class student work. Half and quarter unit courses at Bucknell should have proportionate expectations for student engagement.

Second degree: As noted above, normally only one undergraduate degree may be received. However, students who have received one baccalaureate degree, whether at Bucknell University or elsewhere, may seek a subsequent, second baccalaureate degree in a different curriculum by applying to the dean of admissions; acceptance requires the approval of the dean of the college and the dean of admissions. To be accepted as a candidate for a second baccalaureate degree, the new program must be fundamentally different from the first and must be judged by the University to be educationally necessary. The second degree program must require at least two years of academic work (16 course credits). All requirements for the second degree, including the major and general education requirements, must be fulfilled if the appropriate courses were not taken previously; coursework for the second degree must include the number of courses required by the major (which may include electives in the major if some of the requirements were taken previously); all additional course credits must be taken in residence. Second-degree applicants must follow the transfer application process described under Admissions Information elsewhere in this catalog. Financial aid for second-degree students is extremely limited. Inquiries regarding second-degree admission should be directed to the Office of Admissions.

Eight-semester requirement: Students are expected to meet all degree requirements within eight semesters (including semesters on approved programs off campus and semesters elsewhere for transfer students) and ensuing summers. Only in exceptional circumstances will the dean of the student’s college approve an extension to nine semesters of study. In some degree programs, a fifth year of full-time study may be required if a student fails to earn passing grades in all required courses and achieve the minimum GPA necessary for graduation at the end of his or her senior year.

Courseloads and full-time status: The normal courseload is four course credits. Special permission from the associate dean of the student's college, or assistant director for students in the School of Management, is required for enrolling in less than 4.0 or more than 4.75 credits. Permission for underloading (less than 4.0 credits) is granted when the student provides a legitimate academic rationale. Permission to enroll in more than 4.75 credits, or overload, is granted when the student has demonstrated superior performance (typically a 3.5 GPA) in a normal courseload.

All degree candidates, including seniors, are expected to be enrolled each semester as full-time students, carrying a minimum of 3.0 credits, regardless of the number of course credits previously earned or planned for the future.

Exceptions for part-time status (less than 3.0 credits) are made only in most unusual circumstances, such as severe health difficulties or nontraditional status such as that of a regular full-time University employee. All underloads or overloads must be approved by the dean of the student's college, or assistant director for students in the School of Management.

Residence requirement: All candidates for a degree are required to be in residence for a minimum of two semesters during the junior and senior years, including the final semester. Transfer students must be in residence for a minimum of three semesters, earning a minimum of 12 Bucknell course credits, regardless of the number of credits earned elsewhere previously.

"Double counting" courses toward requirements: In some limited instances, a course may be used to fulfill two College Core Curriculum requirements. (See the College Core Curriculum summary.)

Courses which fulfill general education requirements (the College Core Curriculum requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences) also may be used to fulfill major or minor requirements. However, courses cannot be counted in more than one major or minor; where one major or minor course satisfies the requirement in another major or minor, it must be replaced by an elective in the second major or minor. Major related requirements may be counted toward another major or minor.

Advising: Faculty advisers and administrative staff stand ready to consult with each student regarding the academic program. (The faculty adviser’s signature is required for the initial course registration each semester and for most subsequent changes.) In addition, the registrar periodically provides the student with an Academic Progress Report. However, it remains each student’s responsibility to fulfill all requirements for the major and the degree.

Academic Standing

All students are expected to earn and maintain good academic standing as has been defined for their class. To be in good academic standing (and to be eligible for continued enrollment) students normally must pass a minimum number of courses and earn a minimum cumulative grade point average as follows:

ARTS AND SCIENCES

Beginning of Semester 2
Minimum number of courses passed: 3
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 1.80

Beginning of Semester 3
Minimum number of courses passed: 7
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 1.80

Beginning of Semester 4
Minimum number of courses passed: 11
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 1.90

Beginning of Semester 5
Minimum number of courses passed: 15
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 1.90

Beginning of Semester 6
Minimum number of courses passed: 19
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 2.00

Beginning of Semester 7
Minimum number of courses passed: 24
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 2.00

Beginning of Semester 8
Minimum number of courses passed: 28
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 2.00

ENGINEERING

Beginning of Semester 2
Minimum number of courses passed: 3
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 1.80

Beginning of Semester 3
Minimum number of courses passed: 7
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 1.80

Beginning of Semester 4
Minimum number of courses passed: *
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 1.90

Beginning of Semester 5
Minimum number of courses passed: *
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 1.90

Beginning of Semester 6
Minimum number of courses passed: *
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 2.00

Beginning of Semester 7
Minimum number of courses passed: *
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 2.00

Beginning of Semester 8
Minimum number of courses passed: 29.5
Cumulative Grade Point Average: 2.00

*Students must have earned within one (1) course credit of the credits required for their curriculum.

1) Students who have earned the minimum grade point average required but who have not passed the minimum number of courses required are placed on "credit warning." Such students must make up their credit deficits either by attending the Bucknell summer session or by attending another accredited institution in the summer. In the latter case, prior approval of both the institution and the course(s) must be obtained from the student's adviser, the Bucknell department chair in which the course would most appropriately fit, and the registrar.

2) Students who have not earned the minimum grade point average required are either subject to dismissal from the University or, if the average is close to the minimum, are placed on University "grade point warning." Students on warning are required to attend the Bucknell summer session and to earn sufficiently high grades so as to reduce significantly their grade point deficits before the beginning of the next academic year.

3) Engineering students who have not met the minimum grade point average in all courses in the College of Engineering are placed on "engineering grade point warning," and may be required to attend the Bucknell University summer session to earn sufficiently high grades so as to reduce significantly their engineering grade point average deficit or may be subject to dismissal from the engineering degree programs. Minimum engineering grade point averages are: 1.80 at the start of the third semester, 1.90 at the start of the fourth semester, and 2.00 at the start of the fifth and subsequent semesters.

The dean of the student's college also will review academic records at the conclusion of the fall semester.

1) Students who have a credit deficiency will be notified by the dean of the student's college that they are not in good academic standing, and will be placed on "credit warning." Such credit deficits will need to be made up during the following summer (see above) at Bucknell University or elsewhere.

2) Students who have a cumulative grade point average below that required at the end of the academic year — that is, 1.80 for first-year students, 1.90 for sophomores, and 2.00 for juniors — will be notified by the dean that they are on "grade point warning" or are advised to withdraw, or are subject to dismissal, depending upon the severity of the difficulty. (Continuation of a grade point deficiency could well lead to required summer school at Bucknell or dismissal at the end of the spring semester).

3) Seniors must be in good standing (both in terms of grade point average and passed courses) in order to be eligible to enroll in the final semester.

4) Engineering students who have not met the minimum grade point average in all courses in the College of Engineering are placed on "engineering grade point warning" and may be advised to withdraw, or may be subject to dismissal, depending on the severity of the difficulty. Minimum engineering grade point averages are 1.80 at the start of the third semester, 1.90 at the start of the fourth semester, and 2.00 at the start of the fifth and subsequent semesters.

All of the foregoing provisions are those normally followed in instances of grade point or credit deficits. However, it should be noted that occasionally a student may be technically in good academic standing and yet be subject to academic dismissal. Such instances might include a disastrous performance in the most recent semester and/or a pattern of decline in performance over several semesters. Similarly, grade point or credit deficiencies may be so great as to eliminate the possibility of continuation ‘‘on warning’’ either in a spring semester or during the summer.

Conversely, in exceptional circumstances, the definition of normal progress toward the degree in terms of passed credits may be altered by the dean of the student’s college to allow a student to extend his or her undergraduate career to nine semesters.

Students frequently are well advised to consider withdrawing from the University if academic difficulty persists or seems likely to occur. Consultation with staff in the office of the dean of the student’s college may be helpful in such instances.

It is the prerogative of the deans of the colleges to dismiss a student from the University at any time, or to place a student on ‘‘warning’’ for one semester or longer, for academic reasons.

In all matters pertaining to academic standing, the decisions of the deans of the colleges will be final. If a student is dismissed for academic reasons, readmission consideration may not be given until one calendar year has passed. Readmission is not automatic. Readmission will be considered only upon formal request, and will be approved only if there is substantial evidence that return is likely to be successful, including the reasonable expectation of earning good standing. Requests for readmission consideration must be submitted to and approved by the dean of the student’s college.

Registration, Enrollment, and Withdrawal

Registration and Enrollment

Course registration: Registration must be for a specified number of courses. Regardless of the number of course credits previously earned, degree candidates must elect at least the minimum number of three courses required each semester. The faculty adviser's signature is required for the initial schedule each semester and for subsequent changes.

Course cancellation: The University reserves the right to cancel any course for which fewer than eight students are registered, or for other cogent reasons.

Courses that may not be elected for credit: No credit will be given (nor may a second grade be earned) for a course previously passed or for a course with content similar to one previously completed. (A list of such cross-listed courses is published in each semester's Schedule of Classes.) In addition, courses that have been audited may not be taken subsequently for credit. Language courses which are below the student's language placement may not be elected for credit unless, in extenuating circumstances, authorized by the language department chair (or program director) and the dean of the student's college.

Military science: In addition to electing courses for credit each semester, a student may elect the basic course in military science of the Reserve Officers Training Corps. Credit for one elective course may be granted for the satisfactory completion of the advanced course in military science; request for such credit must be made to the associate dean of the student's college.

Auditing: By definition, it is not appropriate to enroll as an auditor for courses involving studio art, dance, sign language, independent study, thesis preparation, or for any course requiring extra time and attention from the instructor. Note that courses that have been audited may not be taken subsequently for credit.

Regularly enrolled, full-time undergraduate students may carry audits in addition to their regular course load without additional charge. For any audit by all other students, the course audit fee is charged. Regularly enrolled, full-time students who wish to visit a class, without registration and without record, may do so with the permission of the instructor on a space-available basis.

Financial obligations: To be admitted to any course, a student — whether a graduate or an undergraduate — must pay the semester's bill in full, or else make satisfactory arrangements with the Office of Finance.

Several plans for payment of tuition and other charges are available. Students and parents receive information about these plans directly and make arrangements with the organization of their choice.

Adding and dropping courses (first two weeks of semester): Students may add and drop courses, subject to space availability, during the first two weeks of the semester.

Withdrawal from courses, withdrawal from the University, Leave of Absence

Withdrawal from (dropping) courses: Students may withdraw from a course during the usual two week drop/add period by filing a completed Drop/Add form with the registrar. If another course is not added, the remaining course load must be no less than the minimum required three course credits and normal progress toward the degree will be considered. Reducing the course load to three course credits requires the approval of the faculty adviser and academic dean. (Financial aid packages are not likely to be extended or redefined to cover extra summers or semesters when the student elects a less-than-average course load, thereby requiring additional periods of enrollment. Questions concerning the Financial Aid ramifications of "less-than-average course loads" should be pursued directly with the Office of Financial Aid.)

After the usual two-week drop/add period, all course withdrawals must be approved by the student's academic dean. In unusual circumstances dropping a course may be approved through the fourth week of the semester if the student is still carrying three course credits; in two semesters, as exceptions to this four-week limit, dropping a course may be permitted through the 10th week of the semester. The grade of "W" is assigned for all such approved course withdrawals after the first two weeks of the semester.

Exceptions to these deadlines may be approved only if there are serious health difficulties or similar extenuating circumstances. Poor performance, anticipation of poor performance, extracurricular obligations, changes in educational plans or interests, or the existence of extra course credits, are not considered extenuating circumstances.

Voluntary withdrawal from the University and readmission: A student who is unable to meet the demands of an academic program during a semester, due to personal or health reasons, should contact the office of the dean of the appropriate college to discuss possible options. Such a student may be well advised to consider a voluntary withdrawal. Withdrawals after the second week of the semester will result in the recording of WP or WF grades for each course. (See the System of Grading below.) Withdrawals after the first week of the semester normally will result in the loss of some or all tuition. (See Deposits and Refund policies.)

A student who does not plan to continue at the University, for whatever reason, at the conclusion of a given semester, should be referred to the office of the dean of the appropriate college to complete the necessary forms for effecting a voluntary withdrawal.

A student who withdraws from the University during a semester or at the end of a given semester may apply for readmission. A written request should be sent to the associate dean of his/her college before June 1 for the fall semester, or before November 1 for the spring semester. Normally, a student who withdraws during a semester, but after the first four weeks of the semester, will not be considered for readmission for the next regular semester.

Health withdrawal and readmission: A student who withdraws for approved health reasons, as certified by the director of the student health service or the director of psychological services, and approved by the student’s academic dean, must submit a request for readmission to the associate dean of his/her college by June 1 for the fall semester and by November 1 for the spring semester. Further, the student also must submit a request for return to the appropriate health director (i.e., student health service or psychological services) not less than two months before the beginning of the semester. This request must be accompanied by a statement from the attending physician or psychologist for review by the appropriate director.

Readmission in such instances requires, at a minimum, clearance by the appropriate Bucknell University health director and may require approval of the academic dean.

Suspension: Suspension is a sanction that makes a student ineligible to continue enrollment and/or re-enroll at the University for a specific period of time. The Hearing Board or Administrative Hearing Officer making the decision to suspend will determine the date when the suspension shall take effect and the earliest date that the individual is eligible to re-enroll in the University and conditions, if any, that must be met before re-enrollment.

Should an individual be suspended within a semester, any refund of room, board, tuition, or fees will be made in accordance with applicable policy; no academic credit may be earned for that semester; and the student may not transfer in academic credit in a period of suspension from other institutions of higher education. Grades of WP or WF will be recorded if the suspension is after the second week of classes. However, a student on suspension may carry course work elsewhere, not for transfer credit, but simply for personal edification or growth.

Suspension also applies to a student organization and requires that the group cease operation for a period of time. The Hearing Board or Administrative Hearing Officer making the decision to suspend will determine the date when the suspension shall take effect and the earliest date that the group is eligible to begin operation at the University and conditions, if any, that must be met before returning.

Leave of Absence: A student in good standing who wishes to temporarily interrupt studies may apply to the dean of the college for a leave-of-absence if the student intends to complete degree requirements at Bucknell University and if the courses for the semester preceding the leave have been satisfactorily completed.

The leave-of-absence will be for one semester. A student on leave will not be carried on Bucknell University rolls during the period of the leave. A student may be approved for only one leave-of-absence in any 12-month period. The 12-month period begins on the first day of the student's leave-of-absence.

Applications for leaves-of-absence normally will be submitted by August 1 for the fall semester, and by January 1 for the second semester. In no case will they be accepted after the student has completed the first day of class for a given semester. Students not wishing to continue their coursework after completing the first day of class will be processed as a voluntary withdrawal (see "Voluntary withdrawal from the University and readmission").

Leaves-of-absence will not be granted if the reason for separation is health,* academic, or disciplinary, or if, in the opinion of the dean of the college or the dean of students, the student may require advice and consultation before returning. During a leave-of-absence, students are not permitted to take academic coursework. Any exception to this regulation would require prior permission of the dean of the college and in no case would more than two course credits be approved.

Students on leave-of-absence who subsequently fail to return to Bucknell University will be administratively withdrawn with an effective date reverting back to the last date of attendance at the University. If a student decides to enroll at another institution and not return to Bucknell University, they must contact the dean of the college and initiate withdrawal from Bucknell University. In both cases a student will be required to submit an application to the dean of admissions to return to Bucknell University.

*A student who leaves for health reasons, as certified by the director of the student health services or the director of Psychological Services, must withdraw and must follow the procedures for readmission consideration noted above (see "Health withdrawal and readmission").

A student who withdraws because of pregnancy or pregnancy-related disabilities will be reinstated for any semester or term requested to the status held prior to withdrawal.

Credit and Evaluation

Credit and transfer credit

Course credit: The unit of credit is a course credit. Normally a one-semester course is one course credit. However, some courses range from one-quarter course credit to three course credits. Four course credits constitute a normal load; three course credits constitute a minimal full-time load. For purpose of comparison, one course credit is considered equivalent to four semester hours or six quarter hours.

Many classes at Bucknell University meet for three scheduled hours of instruction per week. A number of classes also have scheduled contact hours beyond three per week. Courses are equivalent to four semester hours or six quarter hours because they include scheduled, faculty-supervised activities (such as labs, service learning, common hours, etc.) and/or intensive, iterative faculty involvement in student performance and achievement with independent or small-group student work (such as writing assignments, problem sets and problem-solving activities, student performances in the arts, student creative work, etc.). Courses at Bucknell that receive one unit of academic credit have a minimum expectation of 12 hours per week of student academic engagement. Student academic engagement includes both the hours of direct faculty instruction (or its equivalent) and the hours spent on out-of-class student work. Half and quarter unit courses at Bucknell should have proportionate expectations for student engagement.

Advanced Placement and credit: Bucknell University recognizes advanced scholastic achievement in secondary schools by granting to qualified students University credit, advanced placement, a reduction of general education requirements, or a combination of these. Students receiving such recognition may enroll, as first-year students, in advanced courses in the subjects in which they have received the advanced placement, or they may elect courses in other subjects. This plan of advanced placement creates the opportunity to begin college work at a higher level, and it may shorten the time required to complete one's undergraduate work.

Course credits granted through the advanced placement program may be used to fulfill appropriate degree requirements. These normally include the disciplinary breadth requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences, minimum course credits required for graduation, and, if approved by the registrar and the department involved, specific major or minor requirements. (Physics credits may be considered as a laboratory science for the natural science divisional disciplinary breadth requirement only if approved by the department. Chemistry credits are not considered as a laboratory credit.)

A student's performance on the Advanced Placement Tests of the College Entrance Examination Board will determine whether advanced placement and credit will be granted. Most departments give credit for scores of 4 or 5. Credit is not given for scores of 1 or 2. In all instances, the credit will be given only for work equivalent to courses in the academic departments of the university. There is a limit to the amount of credit which may be granted in most subject areas. In addition, there is an eight-course maximum on the total credit which may be granted for advanced placement tests and for college work taken while in secondary school.

For more information pertaining to advanced placement and credit, see Advanced Standing for First-year and Transfer Students.

International Baccalaureate and credit: IB Diploma recipients, with a minimum score of 5 on each of the six subject examinations, will be awarded six course credits toward their degree requirements at Bucknell. Diploma recipients, not meeting the minimum score requirements, will receive course credit for only those higher level courses passed with a score of 5 or higher. IB Certificate students (non-diploma) will receive course credit for each higher level course passed with an examination score of 5 or higher. No credit is awarded for standard level courses except as noted for IB Diploma recipients above.

Credit by examination: Full-time undergraduate students in residence may earn undergraduate credit by examination, with a letter grade assigned, in courses approved by a department and by the dean of the college concerned. Credit by examination is not available to graduate students, special students, students who have previously audited, withdrawn, or failed the course, students on exchange from other universities, and persons who have never attended Bucknell University.

A list of courses available for credit by examination is available from the registrar. Application for such examinations must be made at specific times on a form available from the registrar. Approval must be obtained from the department chair and dean of the college concerned. If approval is given, the nonrefundable credit by examination fee is to be paid to the cashier for each examination, and the examination is to be taken at the appointed time.

A maximum of six course credits may be earned from credit by examination, credit granted for achievement on comparable subject tests of the College Level Examination Program, and nontraditional study courses. (Note that these six course credits are in addition to the eight-course maximum permitted under "Advanced Placement and Credit." )

Students in residence are expected to carry the minimum of three academic courses in each semester, not including possible credit by examination. Credit by examination grades of F are not recorded on the permanent record. The faculty is not expected to assist students in preparing for these special examinations.

Coursework elsewhere and transfer credits: Following admission, coursework elsewhere is permitted only during the summer when approved in advance by the registrar and during the academic year when approved in advance by the registrar and the director of international education; study elsewhere during the academic year is approved only for authorized programs abroad and a limited number of previously approved domestic programs. Credit for courses taken elsewhere, including courses taken previously by incoming first-year and transfer students, must be approved by the registrar.

The specific amount of credit which is posted to the student's Bucknell University academic record is based on the formula noted above (See "Course credits"). That is, one Bucknell University course credit is equivalent to four semester hours or six quarter hours. As a one-time exception to this formula, a student may receive a maximum of 2.0 Bucknell course credits for six semester hours or 2.0 Bucknell University course credits for nine quarter hours; thereafter, the usual formula is applied.

Grading System

Grading: The performance of a student in each course is evaluated on the grade report by the use of the following symbols:

A: Superior achievement

A-

B+

B: High pass

B-

C+

C: Pass

C-

D: Low Pass

P: Passing work; no grade assigned

F: Failing work

I: Incomplete work; to be assigned only in accordance with the restrictions indicated below

AU: Work as an auditor, for which no credit is given

IP: Incomplete work in continuing courses for thesis, research, or honors project.

W: Approved withdrawal from a course during the extended drop period. Also may signify an authorized health withdrawal from a course at any time. (See paragraph below.)

WP: Approved withdrawal from a course after the prescribed time limits with a passing grade; usually approved only when the student is voluntarily withdrawing from the University or is suspended. (See paragraph below.)

WF: Approved withdrawal from a course after the prescribed time limits with a grade below a D; usually approved only when the student is voluntarily withdrawing from the University or is suspended. (See paragraph below.) Course credit is not given for a grade of F, AU, W, WP or WF.

All course withdrawals must be approved by the student's academic dean. In unusual circumstances, dropping a course may be approved through the fourth week of the semester if the student is still carrying three course credits; in two semesters, as exceptions to this four-week limit, dropping a course may be permitted through the ninth week of the semester. The grade of "W" is assigned for such approved course withdrawals. Exceptions to these deadlines may be approved only if there are serious health difficulties or similar extenuating circumstances. Poor performance, anticipation of poor performance, extracurricular obligations, changes in educational plans or interests, or the existence of extra course credits are not considered extenuating circumstances.

The grade of P, signifying passing work but with no grade assigned, is applicable only in courses specifically approved by the faculty.

The temporary grade of Incomplete will be authorized in the event of serious illness or personal emergency when requested by a student and approved by the course instructor and the dean of the student's college prior to the end of the examination period. Normally such a request will be in the form of a written petition, which will specify the date for its resolution, usually not later than three weeks after the end of the semester. The grade to which the incomplete will revert if the required work has not been completed by the specified date will be assigned by the instructor at the time the incomplete is authorized. Extension of the deadline must be approved by the dean of the student's college and will be granted only under exceptional circumstances, such as may occur in the case of missed laboratory work.

Grade Point Average: Four quality points are given for each full course graded A, 3.67 for each one graded A-, 3.33 for each one graded B+, 3 for each one graded B, 2.67 for each one graded B-, 2.33 for each one graded C+, 2 for each one graded C, 1.67 for each one graded C-, 1 for each one graded D, and none for each course graded F or WF. A student’s grade point average (GPA) is computed by dividing the number of quality points earned by the number of course credits attempted. The GPA calculation is carried to three places beyond the decimal point (i.e., thousandths) and is NOT rounded, but is truncated to two places beyond the decimal point (i.e., thousandths) to establish the official grade point average. Thus, for example, a student with a grade point average calculation of 2.799 has an official GPA of 2.79. Note that a grade of F or WF is included in the GPA.

Grade changes: Student-initiated requests for changes in a final course grade must be submitted by the first day of classes of the second academic year following the year in which the course was originally taken. For example, if a course was taken in spring 2011 the student's request for a grade change must come to the faculty member by the first day of the fall 2012 semester. Such a time period allows for individuals to appeal grades if they have been away from campus for study abroad, leave-of-absence, or other separations from the University.

Superior Academic Achievement

The University recognizes superior academic achievement in a variety of ways. Among these are appointment to the dean's list, receipt of the President's Award for Distinguished Academic Achievement, the granting of degrees with distinction, graduation with honors, election to honorary and professional societies, and the awarding of prizes.

Dean's List

Undergraduates who successfully complete no less than 3.0 course credits during the semester and who earn a semester grade point average of 3.50 or higher receive dean’s list honors for that semester.

President's Award for Distinguished Academic Achievement

Rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and graduating seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 4.0 receive the President’s Award for Distinguished Academic Achievement. In addition, there is provision for such recognition for rising seniors and graduating seniors who have met equivalent, specified criteria for a combination of years; details may be obtained from the registrar.

Degrees with Distinction ("Latin" honors)

Degrees with distinction are awarded to bachelor's degree candidates who have taken 30 percent or more of the number of courses required for graduation in courses numbered above 199. Additional requirements for graduation with distinction are as follows:

A degree Summa Cum Laude is awarded to a candidate who has achieved at the time of graduation a grade point average of 3.90, or better, and who has been in residence at Bucknell University for at least three years. (That is, having earned at least 24 Bucknell course credits.)

A degree Magna Cum Laude is awarded to a candidate who has achieved at the time of graduation a grade point average between 3.70 and 3.89 and who has been in residence at Bucknell University or at least three years. (That is, having earned at least 24 Bucknell course credits.)

A degree Cum Laude is awarded to a candidate who has achieved at the time of graduation a grade point average between 3.50 and 3.69.

Honors Program

All academic departments and interdisciplinary majors of the University offer the possibility of departmental honors, coordinated through the University Honors Council, in which students in those majors may undertake special studies or investigations.

The honors program also operates within the special programs known as the College Major and the Interdepartmental Major.

Students interested in departmental honors should consult the heads of the departments and must apply for honors in accordance with the procedures established by the Honors Council.

Honorary, Recognition, and Professional Societies

Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest national honorary scholarship society in America, and of Tau Beta Pi, the national engineering honorary scholarship society, are active on the campus. Phi Beta Kappa members are elected from the upper eighth of the junior class and upper fifth of the senior class.

There is a chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta, a national honorary scholastic society for first-year students. There is also a chapter of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars for first-year students and sophomores.

Omicron Delta Kappa and Mortar Board, national recognition societies for juniors and seniors, select their members for excellence in scholarship, leadership, and service. There is a chapter of Theta Alpha Phi, for recognition of excellence in dramatics.

There are also chapters of the following national honor societies:

Alpha Chi Sigma (chemistry)
Alpha Kappa Delta (sociology)
Chi Epsilon (civil engineering)
Delta Mu Delta (business administration)
Delta Phi Alpha (German)
Kappa Delta Pi (education)
Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics)
Phi Sigma (biology)
Phi Sigma Tau (philosophy)
Pi Delta Epsilon (journalism)
Pi Delta Phi (French)
Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics)
Pi Sigma Alpha (political science)
Psi Chi (psychology)
Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish)
Sigma Pi Sigma (physics)
Tau Kappa Alpha (debating)

Professional societies having chapters on the Bucknell University campus are the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Chemical Society, the Society of Women Engineers, the National Society of Black Engineers, and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers.

Conduct Expectations and Regulations

Faculty members, administrators, and students of Bucknell University believe that the educational aims and purposes of Bucknell must be upheld and promoted by the personal integrity and responsibility of each individual member of the university. The University values a constituency composed of individuals with varied interests and diversity of opinion, and also recognizes that its members must be bound together by respect for the individual and collective rights of other members of the academic community.

Rules and regulations to promote necessary order and unity stem from the corporate authority of Bucknell University. That corporate authority, in turn, stems from both public law and the Charter of Bucknell, which was approved by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1846 and which remains under the charge of the University's Board of Trustees. Rules and regulations governing conduct, and procedures necessary for their implementation, express Bucknell's corporate authority for its members and are consistent with the Joint Statement of Principles of Academic Freedom and Tenure (1940), endorsed by the Association of American Colleges and the American Association of University Professors, and the Joint Statement on Rights and Freedom of Students (1967), endorsed by the Association of American Colleges, the American Association of University Professors, and the National Student Association.

In general, an individual's actions off campus are subject only to sanctions of civil authorities; however, whenever its interests as an academic community are clearly involved, the University may take disciplinary action independent of civil authorities. It should be understood that the University may have the responsibility of advising appropriate authorities of violations of civil or criminal law committed by anyone on its campus when a request is made by those authorities for specific information, or when there is a danger to life and/or property.

Acts which will subject a person to University disciplinary action are specified in the Student Handbook. Disciplinary procedures, rights, and censures as established for violations of University regulations are defined in the same publication.

Statement of Student Responsibility

Bucknell University's educational program stresses the preparation of its students for the exercise of high responsibility in all phases of society ... Because our society presents continuing challenges to values, students are encouraged to cultivate respect for other individuals and cultures, enhancing in the course of this pursuit their own moral sensitivity, personal creativity, and emotional stability. At the same time, Bucknell's residential character provides a matrix within which institutional programs and practices that exemplify compassion, civility, and a sense of justice form an aspect of the educational experience. [Mission Statement, page 1]

Bucknell University is accordingly strongly committed to fostering a sense of social responsibility and nurturing an atmosphere of civility and integrity in all areas of student and community life. The following principles guide Bucknell's expectations of its students at all times:

  • As responsible individuals, students are fully and personally accountable for their actions and the consequences of those actions, both on and off campus; inherent in this accountability is the obligation for knowing the policies, procedures, and rules that govern student conduct.
  • As active participants in an educational community, students are expected to give the highest priority to academic opportunities and commitments; specifically, this expectation includes regular class attendance and participation, as well as the timely, responsible fulfillment of class assignments.
  • As members of a social community, students are expected to respect individual differences and the rights of all others; the Bucknell community does not tolerate harassment, discrimination, or violence against any person.
  • As citizens, students are expected to show respect for the property and physical environment of one another, the University, and the local community.
  • As persons with a duty to protect and promote the health and safety of others as well as themselves, students are expected to be free of substance abuse; alcohol and other drug use is never an excuse for unacceptable behavior.

Academic Responsibility

Bucknell University students are responsible for the preparation and presentation of work representing their own efforts. Acceptance of this responsibility is essential to the educational process and must be considered as an expression of mutual trust, the foundation upon which creative scholarship rests. Students are directed to use great care when preparing all written work and to acknowledge fully the source of all ideas and language other than their own.

In cases of alleged academic dishonesty, procedures involving the student, the instructor, the department chair, the appropriate dean, and a Board of Review on Academic Responsibility have been established to assess the facts and determine appropriate penalties, which range from a grade of F on the work to permanent dismissal from the University. Refer to the Student Handbook or Faculty Adviser Handbook for more detailed information.

Class Attendance

The academic goals and achievements of individual students are the University's primary purpose. The University also recognizes the significant contribution of other activities to the academic and personal development of Bucknell students. It is inevitable that conflicts will arise between the pursuit of extracurricular activities and students' academic schedules. With the emphasis on active learning, class attendance has taken an even more vital role in the instructional goals of the University.

It is desirable, when conflicts do occur, that students have a policy available to guide their decisions concerning class attendance. The present policy states the expectations placed on faculty members, students, and extracurricular advisers, so that students may know their options and the ramifications of their choices.

Policy

I. Responsibilities about class attendance:

A. Students are expected to attend the regularly scheduled meetings of the courses for which they are enrolled.

B. Classes scheduled during class hours should be given priority over other activities. "No student who participates in an extracurricular event, team, or program can be penalized solely for missing such extracurricular activities when they are scheduled in conflict with regularly scheduled meeting times of the student's courses." (Action of the faculty, September 1993)

C. Faculty should provide, on the first day of classes, a clear statement of:

1. The consequences of any absences.
2. Scheduled time commitments outside of class.

D. Students should not be required to attend extra or rescheduled academic events that conflict with other classes or other important commitments

II. Responsibilities about non-class activities.

A. Extracurricular advisers should, during the first week of classes, inform students of those dates upon which they will be asked to miss a class due to an extracurricular activity.

B. Students should give faculty as much advanced warning of class absence as possible.

C. University units regularly sponsoring extracurricular activities are urged to develop guidelines about the appropriate level of demands to place upon student participants with respect to missing class.

III. General responsibilities:

A. Since students are ultimately responsible for their education at Bucknell University, they must be the ones to weigh the consequences of missing classes or other activities, and make their choices accordingly.

B. Both faculty and advisers of extracurricular activities are encouraged to be as flexible as possible in addressing attendance requirements.

Students and faculty may seek advice in these matters from their college dean.

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