The College of Engineering is dedicated to providing outstanding educational opportunities in engineering to a predominantly undergraduate student body of talented men and women. In accord with the University’s Mission Statement, the College nurtures the intellectual, professional, and personal development of its students. The College strives to prepare them for entry into the engineering profession, related fields and graduate programs, and for continuing development as highly competent professionals and responsible members of society.

A Bucknell University engineering education is distinguished by frequent interaction between students and faculty, a strong laboratory component in the curricula, and an emphasis on learning within a liberal arts university environment. The faculty are dedicated to teaching excellence and are actively engaged in scholarship in support of the educational mission, the discipline, or the profession.

Curricula in the College of Engineering lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in the disciplines of biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as the Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering. Integrated five-year liberal arts/engineering programs, leading to Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees or a Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Management for Engineers degree, are also offered. In addition, students may choose to integrate their studies by concentrating their electives to pursue interests in a particular area such as biomedical or environmental engineering. The cross-disciplinary nature of these studies allows students from several disciplines to participate in available courses.

Each of the engineering programs emphasizes the fundamentals of mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering science, combined with specialized study in a particular discipline and broadening studies in the humanities and social sciences. Students interested in pursuing computer science as a major may do so as an option under the Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering curriculum or under the Bachelor of Science degree program or the Bachelor of Arts degree program.

Programs in Engineering

The programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in biomedical, computer science and engineering, chemical, civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET (www.ABET.org). The Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering degree program is also accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET (www.ABET.org). All of the programs, including computer engineering and environmental engineering, are designed to develop in students a broad understanding of engineering disciplines, an appreciation of the engineer’s individual and professional role in society, and a capacity for lifelong learning.

The undergraduate engineering programs cover four years, but in five years a student may complete a joint degree in liberal arts and engineering with a major in each college. First-year engineering students may select a specific engineering major when they enroll or remain undecided during the first semester. Engineering students may apply to change from one engineering program to another at the end of one or two semesters; later changes are more difficult but may be possible. Changes from one major program to another may be limited due to enrollment restrictions in the program. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who apply to transfer to the College of Engineering will be subject to a review of their academic performance at Bucknell for entrance into any engineering program, and subject to enrollment limitations that may be in place in specific degree programs. Specific information may be obtained from the associate dean, College of Engineering. During the fall term, all first-year engineering students take calculus, physics, an elective and an introductory engineering course, ENGR 100 (unless they have earned AP or other credit or have a special educational need). In the spring term, they take the first course in their engineering major. The sophomore year continues the emphasis on science and mathematics, and introduces courses in the engineering sciences, such as mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, and materials. During the junior and senior years, most of the work is concerned with the principles of the student’s major engineering discipline.

Each program contains courses in mathematics and natural sciences, a general education component, courses in engineering sciences, and courses in design, systems, and synthesis. The remaining courses, depending upon the specific program, may be in the student’s engineering discipline or in electives.

The General Education Component lends perspective to the traditional engineering studies to promote an understanding of the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context. The general education component also is intended to broaden the intellectual and experiential horizons of the student, to develop creative and critical abilities, and to facilitate an understanding of the social problems faced by humankind in the past, present, and future.

To fulfill the general education requirement, engineering students must successfully complete approved courses in humanities and social sciences. Ordinarily, courses that instill cultural values are approved, while courses that develop personal or professional skills are not. Therefore, approved courses that involve performance also must include theory or history of the subject. Students will fulfill the general education component through a minimum of five approved humanities and social sciences courses, with the following distribution:

  • A minimum of two courses in humanities; in some curricula one must be a first-year course in English literature and composition, and
  • A minimum of two courses in social sciences.

At a minimum, one of the humanities or social sciences courses must satisfy the global and societal perspectives requirement. Of the five courses, two must be from a single department, or at least one course must be at the 200 level or above. Individual departments may have additional requirements.

The current list of approved social science and humanities and global and societal perspectives courses can be obtained in the Office of the Dean of Engineering. The list is updated annually by the Engineering Curriculum Committee.

In addition, the engineering curricula reflect the increased importance of design in the education of today’s students by an integration of design instruction from ENGR 100 through all four years to the senior design courses. The emphasis of all programs is on the development of a broad foundation in engineering and on the initiation of specialized study in a specific engineering discipline.

Whenever appropriate, students may engage in special projects in creative design or in independent study, or they may participate with a faculty member in a research project. Such projects may start in or be carried forward into the summer.

Several engineering departments offer a program of departmental honors in which selected majors may undertake special studies or investigations, leading to graduation with honors.

Students are encouraged to work with their faculty advisers and department chairs to take full advantage of the flexibility of the engineering programs, which makes possible special plans of study appropriate to their individual career objectives. Furthermore, with the approval of the department chair and the dean of the College of Engineering, degree requirements may be altered slightly to accommodate special needs of students with different academic backgrounds, and those who have transferred from other degree programs or from other institutions.

All engineering degree programs require the completion of 34 courses (42 in the combined liberal arts-engineering program and the engineering-management program) with a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.00 overall and in engineering.

To satisfy the University writing requirement, a student must successfully complete three writing courses: one course designated W1 (which must be taken during the first year and which must be taken before the W2 courses) and two W2 courses (usually taken after the first year, but, in any case, at least one of which must be taken after the first year.) Lists of W1 and W2 courses are available on the Registrar's home page (www.bucknell.edu/Registrar) under Course Information.

Writing courses are designed to enhance the student’s understanding of the writing process and to emphasize that writing is a way of learning as well as a communication skill. They may be taken in any department.

Students in the College of Engineering, through judicious choice of electives, may choose a departmental or interdepartmental minor.

Those students who wish to apply the principles, concepts, and methods from their prospective majors to define, understand and solve problems in the life sciences and medical technology have several options. First, students may major in one of the eight Bachelor of Science programs in engineering and use their elective courses to concentrate on biology, chemistry, and biomedical engineering. (Biology students may elect to use their unrestricted electives to take engineering courses.) Second, through a judicious choice of electives, engineering students may complete the chemical and biological studies minor or the biomedical engineering minor. The chemical and biological studies minor allows students to enhance their study of the basic chemical and biological sciences. Alternatively, students may elect the biomedical engineering minor which combines study of the basic biological sciences with their technological application. Students majoring in chemical engineering or biomedical engineering are not eligible for the chemical and biological studies minor. Faculty advisers in these disciplines will advise students on the appropriateness of the various options in light of their particular career goals. Information on specific faculty advisers may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Engineering. Students wishing to complete the premedical requirement should consult the pre-health professions adviser.

To complete the chemical and biological studies minor, students must successfully complete at least five courses as indicated below:

  • CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry I
  • CHEM 212 Organic Chemistry II
  • CHEM 351 Biochemistry or CHEM 231 Analytic Chemistry or CHEM 202 General Chemistry II (CHEM 221 or CHEM 201 are prerequisites for these courses)
  • BIOL 205 Introduction to Molecules and Cells
  • BIOL 206 Organismal Biology

In order to declare a minor a student should obtain a Declaration of Minor card from the Office of the Registrar and have it signed by the department chair offering the minor or by the coordinator for the particular interdepartmental minor. The completed and signed card should be returned to the Office of the Registrar before the end of the first two weeks of the last semester of the senior year (by September 9 for first semester graduates and February 9 for second semester graduates). Students planning on summer graduation must have the card filed by the preceding March 1. Late declarations will not be recorded on the student’s permanent record.

Program in Liberal Arts and Engineering

The five-year programs in liberal arts and engineering offer students the opportunity to obtain a broader education in the arts or sciences while completing the requirements for a major in engineering. Students may combine any Bachelor of Science degree program in engineering with any Bachelor of Arts degree. Upon successful completion of this program, the single degree, Bachelor of Science in the engineering major and Bachelor of Arts in the second major is awarded.

Students may enter these joint programs at any time during the first five semesters of one of the engineering B.S. programs. Students also may apply to enter this program from one of the programs in the College of Arts and Sciences. The timing for this change is critical because of the sequential nature of the courses in the engineering programs. Students interested in making this academic change should consult the associate dean of the College of Engineering as early as possible and not later than the third semester of study.

Students in this program must fulfill the distribution requirements and the major requirements for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and either the Bachelor of Science in biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, or mechanical engineering, or Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering. Suggested course sequences for each five-year program are available from the Office of the Dean of Engineering.

Program in Engineering and Management

The five-year program in engineering and management offers students the opportunity to combine the study of engineering in any of the engineering degree programs with a selected sequence of courses in management. Upon successful completion of this program, the joint degree, the Bachelor of Science in engineering degree (within a specific engineering discipline), and the Bachelor of Management for Engineers degree, is awarded. The degree has the same accreditation status as the four-year Bachelor of Science degree in the engineering program selected. Specific course requirements for the Bachelor of Management for Engineers degree may be found at the management department website.

Prospective students interested in pursuing this five-year degree program are encouraged to apply for admission directly into the program. Students also may enter this joint degree program during the first four semesters of one of the engineering B. S. programs, and should consult with the associate dean of engineering as early as possible and not later than the third semester of study. Admission to this joint degree program may be limited by enrollment.

Suggested course sequences for the program and detailed information on the degree requirements are available from the Office of the Dean of Engineering and the Department of Management.

Graduate Studies

Bucknell University’s graduate program leads to the degrees of Master of Science in chemical, civil, electrical, environmental, or mechanical engineering. Each graduate program is individually tailored to meet the needs, preparation, and goals of the student.

Undergraduate students who have completed three years in the chemical, civil, electrical, environmental, or mechanical engineering program at Bucknell, earned a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0, and who show aptitude for graduate study, may apply for admission to the integrated 3-2 program. This program permits selected students to complete all requirements for both a Bachelor of Science degree and a Master of Science degree in five years. Those students who are selected receive a full tuition scholarship for the fifth year.

Traditional master’s degree programs are offered in addition to the special 3-2 program. Assistantships are available. Information can be obtained from the dean of engineering or the dean of graduate studies.

In addition to formal master’s degree programs, any undergraduate student who has arranged to complete all undergraduate degree requirements may, with prior approval, take up to two courses for graduate credit. An application for graduate credit by undergraduate students may be obtained from the Office of Graduate Studies or the Office of the Registrar.

Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering

Mission Statement

The biomedical engineering department is dedicated to providing the best possible undergraduate biomedical curricula to meet the full range of needs of a highly selective, undergraduate, student body. The program is designed to ensure that our students are qualified to enter and succeed in the biomedical engineering profession through direct entry to the industrial workplace or further professional study. The department strives to achieve a process of continuous improvement of the curricula, provide a faculty which is professionally current in their field and to maintain state-of-the-art facilities.

To do this, the department offers the following:

  • A Bachelor of Science in biomedical engineering degree for students seeking a comprehensive education in biomedical engineering.
  • A minor in biomedical engineering for students in other engineering disciplines seeking a basic competency in the discipline and enhanced background in the life sciences.
  • Elective courses to support the needs of students outside of the major and minor programs.

Program Educational Objectives

The following Program Educational Objectives of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Bucknell University are broad statements that describe the career and professional accomplishments that the program is preparing graduates to achieve. As graduates will pursue diverse career paths, these objectives are intended to apply to those who pursue technical and professional careers.

  • Alumni will experience success in a variety of biomedical engineering-related postgraduate environments or other diverse areas that require technical and/or professional skills.
  • Alumni will contribute to their fields or professions.
  • Alumni will pursue professional development, including continuing or advanced education, relevant to their career path.

The Bachelor of Science in biomedical engineering requirements are:

First Year

First Semester: ENGR 100; MATH 201; PHYS 211; Elective
Second Semester: BMEG 210; BMEG 226*; MATH 202; PHYS 212; Elective

Sophomore Year

First Semester: BMEG 250; CHEM 211; MATH 211; Elective
Second Semester: BMEG 205; BMEG 220*; CHEM 212; ENGR 240; MATH 212

Junior Year

First Semester: BIOL 205; CHEM 221; BMEG 350; BMEG 409*; Elective
Second Semester: BMEG 300; BMEG 408*; CHEM 231; BIOL 221; Elective

Senior Year

First Semester: BMEG 400; BMEG 401; CHEM 343; Elective
Second Semester: BMEG 402; Three electives

The nine elective courses are distributed as follows:

  • Five social science and humanities courses selected from the list of approved courses provided in Information for Engineering Students Handbook (published by the College of Engineering) to fulfill the General Education Component required of all engineering students. These courses must be distributed as follows: 1) a minimum of two courses in humanities; 2) a minimum of two courses in social sciences. Two of these five electives must be taken in one department OR at least one elective must be taken at the 200+ level in any department. One of the five courses must satisfy the global and societal perspectives requirement.
  • One approved 200+ level engineering, math, or science course from the list published by the department.
  • One approved 300+ level engineering course from the list published by the department.
  • One BMEG engineering elective course from the list published by the department.
  • One course in any department or program of the University provided that the prerequisites are satisfied.

*Half course.

Three courses in each student’s program must fulfill the University writing requirement, which includes a W1 course taken in the first year and two subsequent W2 courses. BMEG 401 and BMEG 402 are approved W2 courses.

Minor in Biomedical Engineering

Engineering students not pursuing the Bachelor of Science in biomedical engineering may choose to pursue a minor in biomedical engineering. This minor is attained through a judicious use of electives that combine the study of the basic biological sciences with their area of technological interest. To complete the biomedical engineering minor, engineering students must successfully complete at least five credits from approved courses as follows1:

At least two credits from the following list with at least one having a * designation:

BMEG 421: Light Activated Therapy*
BMEG 431: Biomimetic Materials*
BMEG 441/ELEC 411: Neural Signals and Systems*
BMEG 451: Biomechanics and Injury Prevention*
BMEG 452: Human Factors*
BMEG 461: Brain, Mind, Culture*
BMEG 465: Biomedical Modeling*
BMEG 471/472: Advanced Topics in Biomedical Engineering*
BMEG 480/481: Biomedical Engineering Project
BMEG 490/491: Biomedical Engineering Research
CHEG 452: Bioprocess Engineering
CHEG 460: Biomaterials
MECH 476: Biomechanics

The remaining credits may be chosen from the above list or the following:

BIOL 205: Introduction to Molecules and Cells
BIOL 206: Organismal Biology
BIOL 207: Genetics
BIOL 221: Human Physiology
BIOL 312: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
BIOL 318: Comparative Physiology
BIOL 324: Neurophysiology
BIOL 326: Cytogenetics
BIOL 327: Molecular Biology
BIOL 328: Endocrinology
BIOL 340: Biochemical Methods (CHEM 358)
BIOL 343: Neural Plasticity
BIOL 348: Immunobiology
BIOL 352: Cell Biology
BIOL 365: Introduction to Microscopy
CHEM 340: Biological Physical Chemistry
CHEM 351: Biochemistry I
CHEM 352: Biochemistry II
CHEM 358: Biochemical Methods (BIOL 340)

1Additional courses may be approved by the Biomedical Engineering Department on a case-by-case basis.

For course descriptions go to Course Descriptions - Biomedical Engineering.

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering

Mission Statement

The chemical engineering department is dedicated to providing educational opportunities in chemical engineering to a highly selective, predominantly undergraduate student body of talented individuals. The department encourages close interactions between students and the faculty, who are dedicated to education and are actively engaged in scholarship that enriches the educational program. The program emphasizes active learning with a strong laboratory component. The department nurtures the intellectual, professional and personal development of its students and faculty in order to prepare and encourage them to be highly competent professionals and responsible members of society.

Program Educational Objectives

Following the definition presented by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, the department's educational objective statement broadly reflects the career accomplishments and expectations of alumni who graduate from the program:

Alumni will experience success in a variety of postgraduate environments, including, but not limited to, chemical engineering professional practice and advanced study.

Student Outcome Categories

The statements above are supported by a number of student outcomes, the attainment of which is regularly evaluated. In particular, these are designed to guide student growth and achievement in the four broad categories of:

  • Technical Competency
  • Intellectual Development
  • Societal Responsibility
  • Professional Development

The Bachelor of Science in chemical engineering requirements are:

First Year

First Semester: ENGR 100; MATH 201: PHYS 211; Elective
Second Semester: CHEM 222; CHEG 200; ENGR 215*; MATH 202; Elective; CHEG 101**

Sophomore Year

First Semester: CHEM 211; ENGR 240; MATH 211; ENGR 211*; Elective
Second Semester: CHEM 212; CHEM 231, ENGR 233; CHEG 210; CHEG 102**

Junior Year

First Semester: CHEM 343; CHEG 300; CHEG 302*; Two electives
Second Semester: CHEG 310; CHEG 315*; Three electives; CHEG 103**

Senior Year

First Semester: CHEG 320; CHEG 400; Two electives
Second Semester: CHEG 330, CHEG 410; Two electives; CHEG 104**

The following sequence of courses emphasizes design across the curriculum and develops the professional skills of communication, problem-solving, teamwork, and independent learning: CHEG 200, ENGR 233, CHEG 300, CHEG 315, CHEG 400, and CHEG 410.

The 12 elective courses shown above are distributed as follows:

  • Five social science and humanities courses selected from the list of approved courses provided in Information for Engineering Students Handbook (published by the College of Engineering) to fulfill the General Education Component required of all engineering students. These courses must be distributed as follows: 1) a minimum of two courses in humanities; 2) a minimum of two courses in social sciences. Two of these five electives must be taken in one department OR at least one elective must be taken at the 200+ level in any department. One of the five courses must satisfy the global and societal perspectives requirement.
  • Two courses selected from the list of approved technical electives published by the department which may be found on the department web page.
  • One approved biological-science course selected from the list of approved biological-science electives published by the department which may be found on the department web page.
  • Two additional courses in chemical engineering.
  • Two unrestricted electives in any department or program of the University.

*Half-credit course.

**No credit.

Three courses in each student's program must fulfill the University writing requirement which includes a W1 course taken in the first year and two subsequent W2 courses.

Through judicious choice and curricular planning, students may be able to select a concentration — a series of electives that will allow development of expertise in a particular sub-discipline of chemical engineering. The following concentrations are available: Biological, Environmental, Materials, and Process. Declaration of a concentration is optional. Up-to-date listings of courses which can be used toward a concentration, and other associated requirements, are maintained on the department web page.

For course descriptions go to Course Descriptions - Chemical Engineering.

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering

Mission Statement

Bucknell University’s civil and environmental engineering programs strive to provide the best undergraduate civil engineering education possible within a four-year curriculum. The civil and environmental engineering degree programs seek to prepare our students to become responsible, contributing members of society, and to continue to develop personally and professionally after graduation. The programs are designed to ensure that our students are qualified to enter, and succeed in, the civil or environmental engineering profession, enroll in graduate programs in civil or environmental engineering, or enter related industrial and business professions. Primary emphasis is placed on educational excellence achieved through a coherent and comprehensive curriculum, outstanding teaching, extensive student-faculty interaction, small class sizes, substantial laboratory and field trip experiences, and faculty scholarship that often directly involve students.

Program Goals

The civil and environmental engineering programs seek to prepare students to be successful professionals recognized for their: 1) critical thinking and problem solving based on a fundamental knowledge of humanities, social sciences, mathematics, science, engineering sciences, and a broad range of civil engineering technical areas; 2) consideration of global and societal concerns, ethics, and sustainability when making engineering decisions; 3) leadership and effective communication; 4) civil engagement and contributions to society; and 5) pursuit of lifelong learning and professional development.

Program Educational Objectives

  • Graduates will attain a record of engagement in civil engineering or other fields that require analytical and/or professional abilities.
  • Graduates will attain a record of continuing professional development.
  • Graduates will attain a record of contribution to their fields, professions, or society.

The Bachelor of Science in civil engineering requirements are:

First Year

First Semester: ENGR 100; MATH 201; PHYS 211; Elective: first-year course in English literature and composition
Second Semester: ENGR 101*; ENGR 220; MATH 202; GEOL 150; Elective

Sophomore Year

First Semester: ENGR 208; CHEM 201; MATH 211; MATH 226*; Elective
Second Semester: ENGR 222; ENGR 242; MATH 222*; Science elective: CHEM/PHYS/BIOL/GEOL (200-level or higher with lab), Elective

Junior Year

First Semester: CENG 300; CENG 320, CENG 340; CENG 350
Second Semester: CENG elective; CENG 330; ENGR 212*; Elective; Technical elective

Senior Year

First Semester: CENG 490; CENG elective; Elective; Technical elective
Second Semester: CENG 491; Two CENG electives; Elective

The 14 elective courses shown above are distributed as follows:

  • One science elective: biology, chemistry, geology or physics (200-level or higher with lab) approved by the department.
  • Students must fulfill the General Education Component through a minimum of five approved humanities and social science courses, with the following distribution: 1) a minimum of two courses in humanities; one must be a first-year course in English literature and composition; and 2) a minimum of two courses in social sciences. At a minimum, one of the humanities or social science courses must satisfy the global and societal perspectives requirement. Of the five courses, two must be from a single department, or at least one course must be at the 200-level or above.
  • Two unrestricted electives.
  • Four civil engineering electives.
  • Two technical electives: one must be either ENGR 200 or ELEC 205. The other must be selected from a preapproved list of courses.
  • Each student must fulfill the University writing requirement by completing one W1 course in the first year, followed by at least two W2 courses in subsequent years.
  • Fulfillment of the MATH requirement may be achieved by completion of the five specified MATH courses at Bucknell University, Advanced Placement credit, credit by examination at Bucknell, or approved transfer credit from another institution. Other MATH courses may fulfill this requirement, subject to approval by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

The Bachelor of Science in environmental engineering requirements are:

First Year

First Semester: ENGR 100; MATH 201; PHYS 211; Elective: first-year course in English literature and composition (W1)
Second Semester: ENGR 101*; ENGR 220; MATH 202; GEOL 150; Sustainability Perspectives 1

Sophomore Year

First Semester: CHEM 201; MATH 211; MATH 226*; CENG 340, ECON 103
Second Semester: ENGR 222; ENGR 200; MATH 222*; CENG 442; BIOL 208

Junior Year

First Semester: CENG 320; CENG 350; CENG 445; Unrestricted Elective
Second Semester: ENGR 212*; CENG 440; Technical Elective, Unrestricted Elective; Sustainability Perspectives 2

Senior Year

First Semester: CENG 490; CENG 441; Technical elective; Sustainability Perspective 3
Second Semester: CENG 491; CENG 444, CENG 443, Unrestricted Elective

  • Sustainability Perspectives: four required (One course from each group on approved list, plus ECON 103).
  • Three unrestricted electives. These can be used to pursue additional interests or further develop expertise in a specific area.
  • Two technical electives, selected from a pre-approved list of courses.
  • Each student must meet the General Education Component, including the requirement for Global and Societal Perspectives, through the selection of courses within the Sustainability Perspectives lists and the three unrestricted electives.
  • Each student must fulfill the University writing requirement by completing one W1 course in the first year, followed by at least two W2 courses in subsequent years.
  • Fulfillment of the MATH requirement may be achieved by completion of the five specified MATH courses at Bucknell University, Advanced Placement credit, credit by examination at Bucknell, or approved transfer credit from another institution. Other MATH courses may fulfill this requirement, subject to approval by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

*Half course.

For course descriptions go to Course Descriptions - Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering

Mission Statement

The Bachelor of Science degree in computer engineering is an interdisciplinary degree offered jointly by the departments of computer science and electrical engineering. Computer engineering is a balanced study of both computer hardware and software systems to solve problems and create new systems (students interested in more of a focus on software should consider the computer science and engineering program in the computer science department). The Bachelor of Science degree in computer engineering consists of required courses in computer science and electrical engineering providing in-depth exposure to both disciplines. Students can then select electives in computer science or electrical engineering to focus their course of study towards their individual interests.

Program Educational Objectives

The program educational objectives of the computer engineering program at Bucknell University are broad statements that describe the career and professional accomplishments that our program is preparing graduates to achieve.

  • Graduates will experience success in computer engineering areas or other diverse fields that require analytical and/or professional skills.
  • Graduates will contribute to their fields or professions.
  • Graduates will pursue professional development, including continuing or advanced education, relevant to their career path.

The Bachelor of Science in computer engineering requirements are:

First Year

First Semester: ENGR 100; MATH 201; PHYS 211; Elective
Second Semester: CSCI 203; ELEC 120; MATH 202; PHYS 212

Sophomore Year

First Semester: CHEM 201; CSCI 204; MATH 211; ELEC 225*; Elective
Second Semester: CSCI 206; ELEC 226*; ELEC 240; MATH 212; Elective

Junior Year

First Semester: CSCI 315; ELEC 320; ELEC 350; Elective
Second Semester: ELEC 347; ENGR 138*; MATH 241; Two electives

Senior Year

First Semester: CPEG 400*; ELEC 471; CSCI 320; Two electives
Second Semester: CPEG 420; CSCI 311; Two electives

*Half-credit course; all others are one-credit courses.

The 10 elective courses shown above must be distributed as follows:

  • Five approved social science and humanities courses to meet the Engineering General Education requirements. These courses must satisfy the following requirements: 1) a minimum of two courses must be in the humanities, and at least one must be an English course; 2) a minimum of two courses must be in the social sciences; 3) at least one course must satisfy the global and societal perspectives requirement; and 4) two courses must be in a single department, or at least one course must be at the 200-level or above.
  • One course at the 200 level or above in the natural sciences (physics and astronomy, chemistry, or biology) or BIOL 121, BIOL 122, GEOL 103, GEOL 150, or GEOL 301.
  • Two courses chosen from the 300-level computer science or 400-level electrical engineering course offerings, except ELEC 495 and independent study courses.
  • Two unrestricted courses in any department or program in the University.

Three courses must fulfill the University writing requirement, which consists of one W1 course taken in the first year and two W2 courses taken at any time after the W1 course. Note that ENGR 138 and CPEG 400 satisfy the W2 requirement.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering

Mission Statement

The mission of the computer science department at Bucknell University is to provide degree programs and courses, consistent with the missions of the University, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Engineering, that meet the full range of needs of the talented, primarily undergraduate student body. To do this, the department provides the following:

  • A Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering degree program in the College of Engineering for students seeking a rigorous engineering education in computer software and hardware systems with an emphasis on computer software (students interested in more of a focus on hardware should consider the computer engineering program).
  • A Bachelor of Science degree program in the College of Arts and Sciences for students seeking a solid foundation in the sciences while gaining an in-depth preparation in computer science.
  • A Bachelor of Arts degree program in the College of Arts and Sciences for students seeking a broad understanding of the liberal arts while gaining an in-depth preparation in computer science.
  • A minor in computer science for students seeking basic competency in the discipline.
  • An interdisciplinary computer engineering program offered jointly with the electrical engineering department.
  • Basic courses to support the general educational needs of students outside of the degree programs and minor.

The department’s philosophy has the following four principles: Departmental programs are based on a common core curriculum that supports the breadth of the discipline. Computer science courses focus on principles; where appropriate, specific systems are studied to illuminate the principles. Courses in the core curriculum typically have a substantial faculty-directed hands-on component in the form of a regularly scheduled laboratory. Departmental degree programs provide the background and experiences appropriate for entering the workplace at the entry level or a variety of graduate programs.

Program Educational Objectives

Computer Science and Engineering degree graduates will be successful professionals in the computer science or other fields, and will be recognized for qualities associated with their Bucknell education. Such qualities include critical thinking, problem solving, and effective communication. Graduates will be prepared to pursue life-long learning such as professional or advanced education.

The Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering curriculum requires 12 course credits in computer science as specified below (computer science electives must be at the 300-level, and no more than one credit from any combination of CSCI 376 and CSCI 378 may count toward the computer science elective requirement):

First Year

First Semester: ENGR 100; First-year course in English literature and composition; MATH 201; PHYS 211
Second Semester: CSCI 203; MATH 202; PHYS 212; Elective

Sophomore Year

First Semester: CHEM 201; CSCI 204; MATH 211; Elective
Second Semester: CSCI 205; CSCI 206; ENGR 220, or ENGR 221, or MECH 220; MATH 222*; MATH 241; Elective

Junior Year

First Semester: CSCI 208; CSCI 315; ELEC 101; MATH 226*; Elective
Second Semester: CSCI 240*; CSCI 311; ELEC 245; One computer science elective; One elective

Senior Year

First Semester: CSCI 320; CSCI 475* (Senior Design Project); MATH 343; Two electives
Second Semester: CSCI 476; One computer science elective; Two electives

The eight elective courses shown are distributed as follows:

  • One laboratory course in the natural sciences.
  • Five approved social science and humanities courses (in addition to the first-year course in English literature and composition) distributed as follows: 1) a minimum of two courses in the humanities; (one could be the required first-year course in English literature and composition); and 2) a minimum of two courses in the social sciences; one must be ECON 103. 3) Two of these six courses (including the English literature and composition course) must be from the same department OR at least one course must be at the 200 level or above. A minimum of one of these five courses must satisfy the global and societal perspectives requirement. Lists of approved social science courses, humanities courses and courses that contain global and societal perspectives are published by the College of Engineering.
  • Two courses in any department or program of the University, provided the prerequisites are satisfied.

*Half course.

See department policy for use of AP credit in chemistry.

Three courses in each student's program must fulfill the University writing requirement which includes a W1 course taken in the first year and two subsequent W2 courses.

As an alternative to the Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering curriculum, students may wish to consider the major in computer science offered in the Bachelor of Science curriculum or in the Bachelor of Arts curriculum. (See the College of Arts and Sciences Course Descriptions for Computer Science)

For course descriptions see Course Descriptions - Computer Science.

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

Mission Statement

The Department of Electrical Engineering is dedicated to providing educational opportunities in electrical engineering and computer engineering to a highly selective, predominantly undergraduate student body. The department emphasizes close interactions between students and the faculty, who are dedicated to education and actively engaged in scholarship that enriches the educational programs. The program emphasizes active learning with a strong laboratory component. The department nurtures the intellectual, professional, and personal development of its students in order to prepare and encourage them to be highly competent professionals, responsible members of society, and life-long learners.

Program Educational Objectives

The program educational objectives of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Bucknell University are broad statements that describe the career and professional accomplishments that our program is preparing graduates to achieve.

  • Graduates will experience success in electrical engineering areas or other diverse fields that require analytical and/or professional skills.
  • Graduates will contribute to their fields or professions.
  • Graduates will pursue professional development, including continuing or advanced education, relevant to their career paths.

The Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering requirements are:

First Year

First Semester: ENGR 100; MATH 201; PHYS 211; Elective
Second Semester: ELEC 120; MATH 202; PHYS 212; Elective

Sophomore Year

First Semester: CHEM 201; ELEC 225*; CSCI 203; MATH 211; Elective
Second Semester: ELEC 226*; ELEC 240; ENGR 221; MATH 212; Elective (Science recommended)

Junior Year

First Semester: ELEC 320; ELEC 350; ENGR 240; Elective
Second Semester: ELEC 347; ELEC 351; ELEC 390; ENGR 138*; Elective

Senior Year

First Semester: ELEC 480; ELEC 491; ELEC 400*; ELEC 471; Elective
Second Semester: ELEC 420; Three electives

*Half-credit course; all others are one-credit courses.

The 10 elective courses shown above must be distributed as follows:

  • Five approved social science and humanities courses to meet the engineering General Education Component requirement. These courses must satisfy the following requirements: 1) a minimum of two courses must be in the humanities, and at least one must be an English course, 2) a minimum of two courses must be in the social sciences; and 3) at least one course must satisfy the global and societal perspectives requirement; and 4) two courses must be in a single department, or at least one course must be at the 200-level or above.
  • One course at the 200 level or above in the natural sciences (physics and astronomy, chemistry, or biology) or BIOL 121, BIOL 122, GEOL 103, GEOL 150, or GEOL 301.
  • At least one 400-level elective course in electrical engineering, not including ELEC 495 and independent study courses.
  • Three unrestricted elective courses in any department or program of the University. It is recommended that students intending to pursue graduate studies choose at least one of these courses: MATH 343, MATH 345, or MATH 362.

Three courses must fulfill the University writing requirement, which consists of one W1 course taken in the first year and two W2 courses taken at any time after the W1 course. Note that ENGR 138 and ELEC 400 satisfy the W2 requirement.

Electrical engineering students who wish to pursue graduate studies in bioengineering or who wish to acquire the biology and chemistry credits needed to prepare for work or further study in the life sciences are encouraged to take a minor in chemical and biological studies or in biomedical engineering. Students who minor in chemical and biological studies are excused from the ENGR 240 requirement.

For course descriptions see Course Descriptions - Electrical Engineering.

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

The discipline of mechanical engineering is the branch of engineering that deals predominantly with the conversion, transmission and storage of mechanical and thermal energy; the generation, transmission and control of forces; the production and regulation of mechanical motion; and the optimal use of materials in the design and fabrication of the requisite machines and mechanisms.

Mission Statement

The Department of Mechanical Egineering is committed to providing the best undergraduate mechanical engineering education possible within the constraints of a four-year curriculum. In accord with the College of Engineering Mission Statement, the mechanical engineering department strives to nurture the intellectual, professional, and personal development of its students. The mechanism for achieving the department’s educational mission is the program of study, the curriculum in mechanical engineering designed to satisfy its Program Educational Objective. The department strives to achieve a process of continuous improvement of the curricula, to provide a faculty who are professionally current in their field and to maintain state-of-the-art facilities.

Program Educational Objective

The Department of Mechanical Engineering seeks to prepare students to be successful in engineering or other careers and to be recognized for qualities associated with their Bucknell educational experiences. These include, for example, critical thinking and problem solving, consideration of global and societal concerns, leadership and effective communication, civic engagement and contributions to society, and pursuit of lifelong learning.

In support of its mission the department offers a master's degree program in mechanical engineering, which has similar goals, while also striving to offer more breadth of knowledge, more detailed understanding, and enhanced technical competence in specialized sub-disciplines. The department supports its mission in a wider context by providing students in other technical disciplines with an understanding of the aspects of mechanical engineering that are appropriate for their own areas of specialization, and to supply a technology component for students enrolled in a liberal arts curriculum.

The Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering requirements are:

First Year

First Semester: First-year W-1 course; MATH 201; ENGR 100; PHYS 211 (4.00)
Second Semester: MECH 220; MATH 202; ENGR 214; MECH 202*; Elective (4.50)

Sophomore Year

First Semester: MECH 222*; ELEC 205; MATH 211; MECH 213; Elective (4.50)
Second Semester: MATH 212; MECH 353; ENGR 240; MECH 216§ (4.00)

Junior Year

First Semester: MECH 313; MECH 355§; MECH 252; MECH151#; Elective (4.00)
Second Semester: MECH 302§; MECH 312; MECH 392; Elective (4.00)

Senior Year

First Semester: MECH 401*; MECH 403; MECH 405; Two electives (4.50)
Second Semester: MECH 402*; Four electives (4.50)

The 11 elective courses shown above are distributed as follows:

  • One course in chemistry (CHEM 201 or CHEM 211 or CHEM 221) which must be taken in the first two years.
  • Select any TWO full-credit courses from the following: (a) any full-credit 200-level or 300-level course in astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology or physics for which prerequisites have been satisfied; or (b) any of the following courses: BIOL 121, BIOL 122, GEOL 103, GEOL 150. Any 100-level science course must be taken within the first three years; or (c) one science course may be replaced by MATH 245, MATH 280 or any 300 level MATH course for which prerequisites have been met.
  • Five approved social science and humanities courses with the following distribution: 1) a minimum of two courses in the humanities, one of which must be a first-year W-1 course taught in the English language, and 2) a minimum of two courses in the social sciences. Two of these five courses must be from the same department OR at least one course must be at the 200-level or above. Lists of approved social science and humanities courses are published by the College of Engineering.
  • One course from the approved list of courses published by the College of Engineering containing global and societal perspectives. This requirement is usually met in one of the above listed social science and humanities electives, but may also be fulfilled using a free elective with any course that appears on the College of Engineering list of approved courses with global and societal perspectives.
  • One 400-level or equivalent course in any department of the College of Engineering.
  • One 400-level course in the department of mechanical engineering or, with permission of the department, a course required for the expected fulfillment of a minor.
  • One course in any department or program of the University.

§Two of these three courses must be taken. One may be replaced by a second 400-level MECH elective for students wishing to have a concentration after consultation with your adviser. Students may concentrate in the thermal fluids energy area (TFE) or in the mechanics materials design area (MMD) by taking three 400-level courses in one of these two areas.

*Half-credit course; all others are one-credit courses.

#Zero credit machine shop practice

Three courses in each student's program must fulfill the University writing requirement.

For course descriptions go to Course Descriptions - Mechanical Engineering.

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