Social Justice CollegeUnderstand the perspectives of marginalized populations. Critically and compassionately examine issues of social justice. Examine topics including poverty, inequality, health care, immigration, LGBT issues and civil rights. Learn about grassroots activism. Advocate for social justice in the community.

RESC 098 10 CRN: 17217
Questioning for the Common Good: Critical Thinking and Social Justice

Prof. Bill Flack, Psychology

Fulfills the Following Requirements:
Engineering Social Science, Writing Level 1

In this Foundation Seminar, we will consider what it means to think, write, and discuss critically ideas and activities related to issues of social justice. Thinking critically means questioning the way things are done, in order to improve them. Writing critically is a way to clarify our thinking and communicate it to others. Discussing our ideas and actions helps us all to learn from each other in ways that enrich our thinking, communication, and action. Although we will discuss a range of social justice issues, we will focus especially on those related to violence, victims, and survivors, both globally and locally. A weekly service-learning placement in a local organization devoted to serving survivors of violence is part of the course

RESC 098 11 CRN: 16521
Genocide: Injustice and Evil

Prof. Serena Fujita, Chaplains & Religious Life

Fulfills the Following Requirements:
Engineering Social Science, Writing Level 1

In response to the Holocaust, the newly formed United Nations adopted a resolution on January 9, 1948, entitled UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide.† The first article of the Convention states "The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish." In this course you will explore the concepts of justice and evil as they pertain to genocide.† You will learn about Raphael Lemkin, a Polish Jewish scholar, who coined the term genocide, in 1944, and the debate over the definition and use of the word. You will study, through historical texts, essays and eyewitness accounts, about the causes and effects of 6 genocides, one pre-modern and 5 that took place in the 20th century.† You will compare and contrast the genocides and consider why so many have taken place in modern times.† You will also be asked to think about the issue of social justice, how the lack of social justice impacted the environment that allowed genocide and how genocide might be prevented in the future. As a second goal, you will be given the opportunity to advocate for change and to promote social justice through writing and speaking skills and through opportunities to engage in community service.

RESC 098 12 CRN: 17832
Change the World

Prof. David Kristjanson-Gural, Economics

Fulfills the Following Requirements:
Engineering Social Science, Writing Level 1

In this course, you will be invited to join an ongoing dialogue about what constitutes social justice, how various dimensions of justice are connected to issues of economic justice, and how best to advocate for social change. In order effectively to participate in this dialogue, you will need to become informed about theories and practices that underlie efforts to manifest social change. We will examine competing theories - by Robert Nozick, John Rawls, Amartya Sen among others - of what social justice entails and how our economic system supports and/or undermines social justice. We will then apply these perspectives to understand ways in which social injustices, such as domination on the basis of economic class, gender, race/ethnicity and sexual orientation, are interrelated and how they might be addressed. Finally, you will be asked to examine social movements that seek to eliminate these injustices in order, ultimately, to articulate your own position on how to change the world.

RESC 098 13 CRN: 17833
South Africa: Apartheid & After

Prof. Geoff Schneider, Economics

Fulfills the Following Requirements:
Engineering Social Science, Writing Level 1

South African Apartheid was one of the most brutal, repressive regimes of the 20th century. And yet, Apartheid was supported by the US and other nations that claim to value human rights. This course will explore South Africaís turbulent history, along with their attempts to build a rainbow nation in the wake of apartheid. As we study South Africaís experiences, we will consider a variety of social justice topics relevant to all human societies, including issues related to human rights, race, gender, and class.

Social Justice College Student Staff


Justin Eyster, Junior Fellow

Justin Eyster

Hometown: Selinsgrove, PA
Major: Competer Science & Engineering
Contact: jde012@bucknell.edu

"My residential college experience was absolutely one of the best aspects of my first year at Bucknell. Through this opportunity, I met most of my best friends, formed a diverse network of contacts, and developed vital intellectual and personal skills such as critical thinking and creativity. I really felt free to be myself among my peers in this group, and by the end of my first semester I couldn't have been happier with my decision to enroll in the residential college program."

Stephanie Houser, Junior Fellow

Stephanie Houser, Junior Fellow

Hometown: Orchard Park, NY
Major: Civil Engineering & International Relations
Contact: sah049@bucknell.edu

"Res colleges is one of the best experiences at Bucknell. It helped me find people that had similar interests and it have me the opportunity to explore my passions with them. Social Justice is something I've always been passionate about, but being in the Res College helped me find an outlet for that passion through class discussions, conversations on the hall or at meals, through speakers and field trips, and even through rallies and protests! SoJo really has changed my life and I can't wait to see how it'll affect next year's class!"

Shiqi Li, Junior Fellow

Shiqi Li, Junior Fellow

Hometown: Taiyuan, Shanxi, China
Major: Applied Mathematical Sciences, Economics, Psychology
Contact: sl035@bucknell.edu

"Growing up in China and having traveled half a globe to study in Bucknell, I decided to live with people sharing similar passions so as to adapt to college life more easily. Living in a Residential College encouraged me to meet people with different backgrounds and offered me a chance to build solid connections with faculty. My experience in the residential colleges has generated influential impacts on my first-year-life and has built my character in many ways!"

Sophia Reeder, Resident Fellow

Sophia Reeder, Resident Fellow

Hometown: Muncy, PA
Major: Biology; Minor: French
Contact: smr020@bucknell.edu

"Joining a res college was one of the best decisions I've made at Bucknell. The friendships you make and the diverse perspectives you gain make a huge difference in your first year and beyond. The res colleges give you a great opportunity to take awesome trips, meet a bunch of great people, and ease your transition into college with this inspiring community."

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