General Management
Management and Law
Organization and Human Resources Management
Decision and Information Sciences
Accounting
Finance
Marketing

The study of management and accounting prepares students to think critically and communicate effectively about the economic, social, political, and cultural issues that they will face throughout their careers. Coursework in management and accounting develops one's capacity to make decisions, take action, and stimulate performance to achieve personal and organizational goals. Accordingly, the School of Management offers elective courses to students in all degree programs in the firm belief that students who may not intend to pursue careers in management should have the opportunity to become familiar with the basic structures, operating mechanisms, and management principles governing business, public, and not-for-profit institutions.

The School of Management provides curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree, with majors in management or accounting. Majors compete successfully for jobs in banking, finance, marketing, human resource management, and other for-profit and not-for-profit fields. Many management and accounting graduates, after working several years, return to M.B.A. programs at major universities such as Chicago, Columbia, Harvard, Northwestern, Stanford, or Virginia. Many other graduates go on to pursue Ph.Ds, law degrees, and other advanced programs of study.

Accounting majors are actively recruited by major CPA firms and numerous global enterprises. The curriculum in accounting provides a solid foundation for students who may wish to qualify as Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) or Certified Management Accountants (CMAs). Students should consult an adviser to develop a program that may meet specific educational requirements for these certifications.

Uniform Certified Public Accountant Examination. The flexibility of Bucknell's accounting program enables students to satisfy the educational requirements established by many states to sit for the CPA exam, including the 150-hour requirement. (Students interested in a particular state should contact its State Board of Accountancy to determine its specific rules and regulations.) Although the accounting degree program requires only 128 semester-hours, students may earn up to 150 semester-hours in four calendar years by supplementing degree requirements with a combination of Advanced Placement (AP) credits, course overloads, summer classes, online coursework and/or internships. Flexibility exists in how students may earn the semester hours required to accommodate state-specific variations in licensing requirements. For example, students may take 4.5 courses each semester at no additional tuition and without requesting approval of the dean (a 5-course load also is permissible in any semester, with the approval of the dean). Thus, a student who opts to take 4.5 courses each semester earns 144 semester-hours over the course of four years, leaving only 6 hours to be completed via AP credits, summer classes, online coursework, and/or those internships approved for academic credit. Although members of the department will advise students concerning course selection, the student is responsible for choosing those courses and experiences that meet specific states' requirements to sit for the CPA exam.

Applying to major in management or accounting. The number of students admitted to the BSBA degree program at Bucknell University is limited. Students who wish to seek the BSBA degree, with a major in either management or accounting, and who were not directly admitted to that degree when admitted to the University, must submit a completed application to the school by the end of the first week of classes of the sophomore year. When the number of applications exceeds the threshold established by the school and the dean's office, criteria for acceptance will emphasize academic achievement. Questions regarding this process should be directed to the chair of the School of Management.

By the end of the third semester, students ordinarily will have completed four core courses: MATH 192 or 201, MGMT 101, MGMT 160, and ECON 103. It should be noted that admission to the BSBA degree program is possible without having completed all four core courses; students should complete them by the end of the sophomore year. Beginning with the second semester of the sophomore year, BSBA students pursue courses required to complete a major in accounting or management and may elect advanced courses within program areas such as finance, marketing, management information systems, operations management, human resources, or accounting.

Prospective applicants are encouraged to meet with management or accounting faculty during their first year of study to discuss important advising issues. BSBA candidates are encouraged to sample among courses offered in all divisions of the University, in the conviction that an effective foundation for continuing professional development in any discipline is built upon the ideas and ideals of a liberal education.

Requirements. BSBA majors in either accounting or management must fulfill all University degree requirements, including the College Core Curriculum, and the following:

Twelve BSBA core requirements: MATH 201 or MATH 192, MGMT 101, MGMT 160, MGMT 161, MGMT 220, MGMT 242, MGMT 340, MGMT 370, MGMT 380, ECON 103 and ECON 256, and one of the following: CLAS 247, CSCI 180, CSCI 203, ENGR 100, ENGR 270, ENST 211, HIST 170, HIST 270, or MGMT 240. (Students should consult with their advisers to select the course from this list that most appropriately meets their educational objectives.)

Required courses for majors:

Accounting: MGMT 250, MGMT 251, MGMT 359 or MGMT 319, MGMT 365, and one of MGMT 353, MGMT 354, or MGMT 357.

Management: MGMT 312, MGMT 319, MGMT 341, and one of MGMT 330, MGMT 335, MGMT 336, or MGMT 339.

A recommended sequence for the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration majors is as follows:

First Year*

First Semester: ECON 103
Second Semester: MATH 201 or 192, MGMT 160

Sophomore Year*

First Semester: MGMT 101
Second Semester: ECON 256, MGMT 161, MGMT 242

Junior Year*

Management Majors: MGMT 220; MGMT 340; MGMT 370, MGMT 380, and electives**
Accounting Majors: MGMT 220, MGMT 250, MGMT 251, MGMT 340, MGMT 370, MGMT 380, and electives**

Senior Year*

Management Majors: MGMT 312; MGMT 319; MGMT 330, MGMT 335, MGMT 336, or MGMT 339; MGMT 341; and electives**
Accounting Majors: MGMT 359 or 319; MGMT 365; MGMT 353 or MGMT 354 or MGMT 357; and electives**


*All BSBA students also are required to elect one of the following: CLAS 247, CSCI 180, CSCI 203, ENGR 100, ENGR 270, ENST 211, HIST 170, HIST 270, or MGMT 240. (Students should consult with their advisers to select the course from this list that most appropriately meets their educational objectives.) Students should consult with a member of the management school faculty to discuss these and other courses that also may fulfill this requirement.

Other course sequences are possible. See "Suggested BSBA Course Schedule" available in the School of Management office or from any management faculty member.

**Management majors are limited to four non-accounting management electives; accounting majors are limited to four accounting electives.

All accounting and management majors must satisfy the Culminating Experience component of the College Core Curriculum. This is typically fulfilled by enrollment in MGMT 319.

Majors are encouraged to pursue off-campus study, either abroad or in approved domestic programs. Many off-campus programs also include internship opportunities. BSBA students may take a maximum of two required management courses in non-Bucknell programs.

The school may assist students in arranging special programs to include study abroad, independent work, field projects and internships, and acceleration in the fulfillment of BSBA requirements. Well-qualified juniors and seniors are invited by the faculty to participate in the departmental honors programs, consisting of participation in advanced seminars and the preparation of honors theses.

Bachelor of Management for Engineers Degree

The Bachelor of Management for engineers degree is open to students admitted to the five-year joint degree program in engineering and management (see Program in Engineering and Management). The program leads to the joint degree, the Bachelor of Science in engineering degree (within a specific engineering discipline), and the Bachelor of Management for engineers degree.

All University degree requirements, including the College Core Curriculum, must be fulfilled along with the following eight BSBA course requirements: MGMT 101 Introduction to Organizations and Management; MGMT 160 Foundations of Accounting and Financial Management I or MGMT 161 Foundations of Accounting and Financial Management II; MGMT 220 Business Law; MGMT 370 Corporate Finance; MGMT 380 Marketing; MGMT 312 Business, Government and Society; MGMT 319 Business Strategy; and a 300-level management elective. Students in this program may satisfy one of the management courses through transfer of credit from a non-Bucknell program, with prior approval of the School of Management. Suggested course sequences for the program and detailed information on the degree requirements are available from the School of Management or the Office of the Dean of Engineering.

 

General Management (MGMT)

101. Introduction to Organization and Management (I or II; 3, 3)
Management theory and practice. Policy formulation, decision making, strategic and operational planning, organization structure and behavior, managerial responsibility and career paths. Includes company project laboratories. Primarily for first-year students, sophomores, and juniors. Not open to students who have taken MGMT 318.

101. Introduction to Organization and Management (I or II; 3, 3)
Management theory and practice. Policy formulation, decision making, strategic and operational planning, organization structure and behavior, managerial responsibility and career paths. Includes company project laboratories. Primarily for first-year students, sophomores, and juniors. Not open to students who have taken MGMT 318.

101. Introduction to Organization and Management (I or II; 3, 3)
Management theory and practice. Policy formulation, decision making, strategic and operational planning, organization structure and behavior, managerial responsibility and career paths. Includes company project laboratories. Primarily for first-year students, sophomores, and juniors. Not open to students who have taken MGMT 318.

162. Bubbles, Panics, and Crashes (I or II; 1.5, 0) Half course.
This course explores the conditions and commonalities underlying some of history's most famous speculative bubbles, with emphasis on speculation in stock and real estate.

212. Business, Government, and Society in France (I; 3, 0)
Political, legal, economic, and social context of business in France. Offered for students in the Bucknell en France program. (Consult with the BEF and management advisers.)

243. Social Media for Managers (I or II; 3, 0)
This course will expose students to the opportunities and challenges project managers face in using new forms of technology-enabled collaboration on a global scale.

285. Leadership in Management and Technology (S; 1.5) Half course.
Interdisciplinary program for leadership in technology and management; macro and micro perspectives, design and TQM, ethical/professional considerations, environmental and energy management. Open only to students admitted to the Institute for Leadership in Technology and Management. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Crosslisted as ENGR 285.

300. Senior Thesis (I or II)
Individual supervised project. Prerequisites: for majors only and permission of the instructor. 3.

301. Independent Study (I or II; R) Half to two courses.
Individual study or projects, supervised by instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

305. New Venture Formation and Management (I or II; 3, 0)
An experiential course addressing unique aspects of forming new ventures. Emphasis on the contributions new ventures make to the economy and society as a whole, the characteristics of entrepreneurs, the special challenges facing small businesses, and the process of starting a new venture. The primary course activity is the construction of a business plan for a prospective new venture. Prerequisites: MGMT 370 and MGMT 380.

312. Business, Government and Society (I or II; 3, 1)
Focuses on the social and political environments in which firms operate. Includes topics such as ethical decision making, managing multiple stakeholder (market and non-market) relationships, business involvement in the public policy process, and the role of the multinational firm in the global economy. Prerequisite: MGMT 101.

315. Special Topics in Management (I or II; R; 3, 3)
A seminar on selected topics in management. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

317. Seminar on Crisis Management (II; 3, 1)
This seminar examines the causes and consequences of industrial crises. Participants learn basic concepts of crisis management and analyze recent cases of corporate crises.

318. Management Theory and Practice (I or II; 3, 1)
Survey and integration of theory and research literature; managerial effectiveness; organization design; decision making; management activities, functions, and careers; power, authority, and leadership; organization change. An introductory management course for seniors and graduate students, as an alternative to MGMT 101. Not open to students who have taken MGMT 101. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

319. Management Strategy and Policy (I and II; 3, 0)
An analysis of the concept of strategy as the basis for understanding the corporation as a social institution; application of strategy as a problem of interdependent choice among stake-holders in a global context. Prerequisites: MGMT 370 and MGMT 380; senior-level course.

383. New Product Development (I or II; 3, 0)
Study and application of innovation in the product development process. Learning is tied to a semester-long project which explores identifying opportunities, value analysis, brand strategy, product positioning, market needs, customer needs, and team management. Prerequisite: MGMT 380 or permission of the instructor.

385. Internship in Management and Technology (S; 1.5, 0) Half course.
Internship in complex management challenges, the integral role of technology in organizations, and interdisciplinary decision making. Open only to students admitted to the Institute for Leadership in Technology and Management. Prerequisites: MGMT 285 and permission of the instructor. Crosslisted as ENGR 385.

390. Honors Course – Management (I or II; R)
Special and independent studies for BSBA students selected under guidelines of the department and the University Honors Council. Honors thesis required. Prerequisite: nomination by the department.

419. Strategic Thinking (I or II; 3, 0)
This course is designed to acquaint students with the history of strategy, introduce theories of strategic analysis, relate specific functional concepts and encourage an objective, broader, longer term, more critical orientation beyond the world of business. Satisfies Capstone and MGMT 319 requirement. Not open to students who have taken MGMT 319. Prerequisite: senior-level BSBA majors only.

 

Management and Law (MGMT)

220. Business Law I (I and II; 3, 1)
Survey of the judicial system, followed by an analysis of contract law and government regulation of business using lecture and case method. Not open to first-year students.

221. Business Law II (II; 3, 0)
Continuation of MGMT 220 with an analysis of the Uniform Commercial Code in the area of sales and commercial paper; the law of agency, partnerships, and corporations. Prerequisite: MGMT 220.

 

Organization and Human Resources Management (MGMT)

330. Human Resources Management (I or II; 3, 0)
Focus is on how human resource management practices can create competitive advantages for organizations and the impact of those practices on employees and communities. Topics include employment law, managing diversity, managing the size and composition of the workforce, job analysis, recruitment, selection, training and development, compensation, performance evaluation, union-management relations, career management, and employer and employee rights. Prerequisite: MGMT 101.

335. Seminar in Organization Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Special topics in organizational behavior, organization theory and design organization development, human resources management, and related topics. Seminar discussions of current theory and research. Fulfills BSBA distribution requirements in organization studies. Prerequisites: MGMT 101 (or equivalent) and permission of the instructor.

336. Organizational Behavior (I or II; 3, 0)
Focus is on explaining, predicting, and influencing the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. Topics include challenges of managing in current organizations, integrating multiple perspectives, perception, motivation, making teams work, internal and external team processes, leadership, power and politics, communication, conflict, organizational culture, managing organizational change, stress management, and individual career management. Prerequisite: MGMT 101 or permission of the instructor.

339. Organization Theory (II; 3, 0)
Focuses on describing organizations and understanding how they interact with their environment. Topics covered include organizational structure and design, organizational culture, power and authority dynamics, economic approaches to organization, and managing organizational change and development. We use these concepts to explain why organizations emerge, survive, prosper, and evolve. Prerequisite: MGMT 101.

 

Decision and Information Sciences (MGMT)

240. Introduction to Information Science (I or II; 3, 0)
This course explores different types of information systems (IS) and the various business functions for which they are used within organizations. Topics include using IS to gain strategic advantage, conducting electronic commerce, managing supply chains, data warehousing and analysis, knowledge management, information systems security, and the impacts of IS upon individuals, organizations and society. Special focus is placed upon current events and hands-on organizational study.

242. Managerial Statistics (I or II; 3, 1)
Introduction to statistics and its applications to managerial decision making. Theory and use of probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, regression, sampling, quality control, and forecasting. Prerequisite: MATH 201 or MATH 192.

340. Decision Sciences (I or II; 3, 1)
This course is concerned with understanding and improving the decision making of individuals and groups in organizations. At issue is not only how decision makers model and solve problems, but also how they came to identify such problems and learn from the results of their actions. Prerequisites: MGMT 242 and MATH 192 or MATH 201.

341. Operations Management (I or II; 3, 0)
Design, analysis, operation, control and improvement of production and service systems; strategic decision making, forecasting, total quality management, process control, layout, inventory control, just-in-time, waiting-line analysis and location. Prerequisites: MGMT 242 and MATH 192 or MATH 201.

342. Special Topics in Information Systems (I or II; R; 3, 1)
Provides focused study on particular topics in information systems. Potential topics include management of information systems, group support systems, electronic-commerce, analysis and design of information systems, and human computer interaction. Emphasis is placed on interactive group projects and managerial implications.

343. Information Systems Analysis and Design I (I or II; 3, 0)
Investigates the methods, tools, and techniques used to analyze and develop organizational information systems. Experiential focus includes feasibility analysis, identifying and modeling business requirements, and managing the systems development life cycle.

346. Special Topics in Decision Sciences (I or II; R; 3, 3)
Provides focused study on particular topics in the decision sciences. Possible topics include optimization, simulation, game theory, decision theory, forecasting, and complexity. Emphasis on applications involving managerial decision making. Prerequisite: MGMT 340 or permission of the instructor.

348. Decision Support Systems (I or II; 3, 0)
Provides an overview of the characteristics, concepts, methodology, and techniques involved in effective decision support systems. Executive workstations, computer graphics, simulations, and applications to strategic planning. Prerequisites: MGMT 342 and MGMT 340.

 

Accounting (MGMT)

160. Foundations of Accounting and Financial Management I (I and II; 3, 1)
An introduction to accounting and financial management theory and practice. The course provides students with a foundation in financial statement preparation and analysis, financial forecasting and modeling, operational budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and capital budgeting. In addition, the course introduces students to financial markets and risk analysis, and underscores the importance of ethical financial reporting.

161. Foundations of Accounting and Financial Management II (I and II; 3, 1)
This course is of interest to a broad audience, including - but not limited to - students wishing to learn more about careers and opportunities in public accounting, financial services, commercial lending, corporate finance, etc. In addition to understanding how General Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) influence the preparation of general purpose financial statements, students are required to 1) understand the theoretical framework that underlies the measurement of income and the valuation of certain assets and liabilities, and 2) research actual business enterprises and perform detailed financial analyses of their results of operation, financial positions, and cash flows. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or permission of the instructor.

250. Intermediate Accounting I (I or II; 3, 1)
Accounting theory and practice applicable to income determination and asset valuation. Stresses critical thinking, develops students' understanding of the environment in which accounting choices are made, and utilizes cases to strengthen students' accounting research and communication skills. Prerequisite: MGMT 161.

251. Intermediate Accounting II (I or II; 3, 1)
A continuation of MGMT 250. This course is of most interest to students wishing to pursue careers in public accounting, institutional investing, and various other opportunities in the financial services sector. Topics covered include intercompany investments, long-term debt, leases, pensions, deferred income taxes, earnings per share, the statement of stockholders' equity, and the statement of cash flows. In addition to an advanced understanding how General Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) influence the preparation of general purpose financial statements, students are required to 1) understand - at an advanced level - the theoretical framework that underlies the measurement of income and the valuation of certain assets and liabilities, and 2) research actual business enterprises and perform detailed financial analyses of their results of operations, financial positions, and cash flows. Prerequisite: MGMT 250 or permission of the instructor.

350. Honors Course – Accounting (I or II)
Special and independent studies for BSBA students selected under guidelines of the department and the University Honors Council. Honors thesis required. Prerequisite: nomination by the department.

353. Advanced Accounting (I or II; 3, 1)
Accounting theory and practice applicable to business combinations, partnerships, governmental accounting, segment reporting, foreign currency translation, and SEC reporting (including the role of accounting research in evaluating and creating accounting regulation). Prerequisite: MGMT 251 or permission of the instructor.

354. Tax Accounting I (I or II; 3, 1)
Survey of federal income taxes with emphasis placed on individual tax law and practice. Other topics include fundamentals of corporate and pass-through entity taxation and federal gift and estate taxation. The student will research, interpret, and apply tax law and study the social and economic implications of tax law, and prepare federal income tax returns. Prerequisite: junior status or permission of the instructor.

355. Tax Accounting II (S; 7.5, 0)
A study of advanced topics of federal income, gift, and estate taxation. Prerequisite: MGMT 354.

357. Auditing (I or II; 3, 1)
Examines the concept, value, professional standards and environment of auditing. Coverage includes ethics and professional responsibility, risk analysis, accounting systems and controls, decision making, evidence accumulation, and auditor reports. Uses writing assignments to develop students' communication skills. Prerequisite: MGMT 161.

358. Computer and Forensic Auditing (II; 2, 0) Half course.
Uses of audit software to obtain and develop evidence, provide decision support, and solve audit problems. Introduction to the work performed by forensic accountants to include fraud understanding, identification, prevention and auditing. Corequisite or prerequisite: MGMT 357.

359. Advanced Seminar in Accounting (II; 3, 1)
An integrative seminar addressing special topics and current issues faced by the accounting profession. The course bridges the gap between accounting theory and accounting practice. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

365. Management Accounting (I or II; 3, 1)
Examines managerial accounting and cost behavior for products and services, specifically, how product cost information is recorded, reported, analyzed and used by managers in decision making. Topics include decision making using accounting information, costing concepts, behaviors, and systems, activity-based costing, capital and operational budgeting, ethical considerations and professional responsibility, and topical accounting research. Writing assignments will be used to develop students' communication skills. Prerequisite: MGMT 161.

 

Finance (MGMT)

370. Corporate Finance (I or II; 3, 0)
Principles of corporate finance theory and management. Lectures and case discussions. Topics include financial analysis and planning, working capital management, capital budgeting, long-term financing and capital structure, and dividend policy. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or MGMT 161.

372. Cases in Corporate Finance (I or II, 3, 0)
Applied corporate finance strategy, including mergers and acquisitions, making intensive use of the case method. Classroom participation and group presentations are heavily emphasized. Prerequisites: MGMT 370 and permission of the instructor.

374. International Finance (I or II; 3, 0)
Fundamentals of foreign exchange markets and international financial markets, international capital budgeting, hedging foreign exchange risks. Prerequisite: MGMT 370 or permission of the instructor.

375. Student Managed Investment Fund I (I; 3, 3)
First semester of a year-long course in which students manage a real dollar investment portfolio. Provides hands-on experience in portfolio management, including economic, industry, and company analysis, and decision making. MGMT 375 is a prerequisite course which carries no credit, but when combined with MGMT 476 and successfully completed gives the student two course credits. Prerequisites: MGMT 370 and MGMT 377, senior status, and permission of the instructor. Applications must be submitted on or around March 15 of the junior year.

377. Investments (I or II; 3, 0)
Principles of investment practice and theory. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of intangible investments (equities, debt and derivative instruments). Other topics include the nature and operation of securities markets, security valuation, company and industry analysis, portfolio construction and management. Selected topics unique to the current investment environment are included on an ad hoc basis. Prerequisites: MGMT 160, MGMT 242, MGMT 370, and permission of the instructor.

378. Investment Banking (I or II; 3, 0)
An economic, historical, and social perspective on the industry from its origin to the present with emphasis on current practices. Prerequisite: junior or senior status.

476. Student Managed Investment Fund II (II; 3, 3) Two courses.
Continuation of a two-semester course in which students develop experience in security research and analysis, asset valuation, asset allocation, and portfolio management by managing a real dollar investment portfolio. Prerequisites: MGMT 375, MGMT 377 and permission of the instructor.

 

Marketing (MGMT)

380. Principles of Marketing (I or II; 3, 1)
The role of the marketing function in the organization. Concepts, philosophies, techniques, and theories pertaining to the exchange process of products and services between institutions and their customers. Prerequisites: ECON 256 and MGMT 101, or permission of the instructor, junior or senior status.

382. Marketing Research (I or II; 3, 0)
Study and application of scientific research methodology. The marketing research process is studied in depth, including the application of statistical techniques to marketing problem solving. Prerequisites: MGMT 242 and MGMT 380 or permission of the instructor.

384. Consumer Behavior (I or II; 3, 0)
Study of consumer buying decision processes within context of marketing strategies. Topics include models of information processing and product evaluation; historical changes in role of culture in assigning meaning to goods as indicators of social status; the diffusion of innovation; and marketing consumer products in international markets. Prerequisite: MGMT 380 or permission of the instructor.

386. Special Topics in Marketing (I or II; R; 3, 3)
A seminar on selected topics in marketing. Prerequisites: MGMT 380 and permission of the instructor.

389. Marketing Management (I or II; 3, 1)
Managerial decision making within the context of the marketing environment. The objectives are (1) to increase the student's familiarity with the field of marketing and (2) to develop the student's capacity for making marketing decisions based on analysis. Prerequisite: MGMT 380.

Courses offered occasionally

103 Communication for Management, 308 Economic Organization Theories, 347 Business Conditions and Forecasting, 360 Accounting Theory, 367 Nonprofit Organization Accounting

Close

Places I've Been

The following links are virtual breadcrumbs marking the 27 most recent pages you have visited in Bucknell.edu. If you want to remember a specific page forever click the pin in the top right corner and we will be sure not to replace it. Close this message.