Please note: You are viewing an archived Bucknell University news story. It is possible that information found on this page has become outdated or inaccurate, and links and images contained within are not guaranteed to function correctly.

[X] Close this message.


April 11, 2005


LEWISBURG, Pa. — Several Bucknell University students presented research at national physics conferences during the 2004-05 academic year.

Presenting talks at the American Physical Society, Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting in Seattle, Wash., in November were:

  • senior Matt Paoletti, Monrovia, Md. - "Mode-locking of chemical pulses in an advection-reaction-diffusion system." Paoletti's research, conducted with Tom Solomon, associate professor of physics, studied how chaotic fluid mixing affects the motion of a "flame-like" chemical reaction front in order to obtain effective mixing of chemicals. This research can be applied to the understanding of the mixing of air and fuel in jet and turbine engines as well as to the medical field in the development of microfluidic devices, which are miniaturized devices used mainly for testing things like blood samples.

  • junior Louis McLane, Severna Park, Md. - "Self-consistent chaotic mixing of active impurities in a vortex chain." McLane's research, also conducted with Solomon, studied how mixing can cause a fluid flow to become unstable in a process referred to as "self-consistent chaos." McLane's research, which also deals with the dynamics of mixing different chemicals, has similar applications in the medical field in the development of microfluidic devices.

Presenting research at the American Physical Society Meeting in Los Angeles, Calif., in March were:

  • senior Elizabeth Baker, Corning, N.Y. - "Correlated Single Particle Jumps in a Glass." Baker's research, conducted with Katharina Vollmayr-Lee, associate professor of physics, described analyzing computer model data for the motion of molecules in a glass in order to understand how particles move in glass. A practical application for this research could be to develop specific materials such as more effective materials for golf clubs.

  • senior Jaime Wallace, Fairfax, Va. - "Cahn-Hilliard Simulation of Anisotropic Coarsening." Wallace's research, conducted with Ben Vollmayr-Lee, associate professor of physics, described a computer modeling of the dynamics of how incompatible materials separate. Wallace's research also focused on the properties between the two components of a metal in alloys and can be applied to the field of metallurgy.

  • junior Melinda Gildner, Duncannon, Pa. - "Anisotropic Lifshitz-Slyozov Theory." Gildner's research, also conducted with Ben Vollmayr-Lee, described the explicit mathematical calculation of coarsening, the dynamics of how incompatible materials separate. Gildner also studied how the properties between the two components of a metal can affect the formation of an alloy, research important in the field of metallurgy.

  • sophomore Phil Marquis, Lakewood, Ohio - "Persistence in Conserved Order Parameter Coarsening." Marquis' research, also conducted with Ben Vollmayr-Lee, described a computer modeling of the dynamics of how incompatible materials separate. Marquis' research focused on alloys, which have two or more components of a metal, with practical applications in the field of metallurgy.

In addition, Gildner presented research at the Rutgers Statistical Mechanics Meeting in New Brunswick, N.J., in December.

Ben Vollmayr-Lee said the students delivered excellent talks. "They put in a lot of time and effort and the reward was they could give expert-level talks to a group of physicists. After their talks, I received complimentary comments from my colleagues."

More information about student research projects in physics at Bucknell can be found at http://www.eg.bucknell.edu/physics/reu/reuauth.html

Close

Places I've Been

The following links are virtual breadcrumbs marking the 27 most recent pages you have visited in Bucknell.edu. If you want to remember a specific page forever click the pin in the top right corner and we will be sure not to replace it. Close this message.