Propaganda brought the nation together, urging all people to combine their resources and efforts in order to win the war. The U.S. may not have been victorious if the government had not utilized the strategy of successful propaganda.



"YOUR SCRAP BROUGHT IT DOWN"
RICHARD THORNBURGH and ABIGAIL PAULES
GROUP I, TEAM 9

Research/Analysis
Released by the United States Government in 1942, “Your Scrap Brought It Down” is simply one example of propaganda used during the war, but in some ways seems to be the most effective. The fact that this poster was created so close in time to the acts of violence inflicted on the innocent scene at Pearl Harbor indicates that the American public would most likely respond to the message. People . . . would help with the war effort at this time of hardship and new, unknown violence.

Donating scrap steel and iron had the greatest impact. Metals were used to [manufacture] ships, guns, weapons, artillery, and bullets. The planes built with scrap steel and iron did shoot German aircraft down, contributing to the Allied victory over the Axis powers.

Evocative Meanings/Interpretation
The artist, S. Broder, created a poster which is the epitome of propaganda, but also is a beautiful work of art. One sees the depiction of a battle scene from the war in the air. A German plane, indicated by the swastika symbols, has been shot down, is engulfed in flames as it descends toward the earth. Black smoke starts from the top, continues further down, then turns to vibrant reds and oranges seen throughout the sky, and inside the cockpit. The plane is plummeting at full speed toward the ground, trails of wind indicating the speed of the motion.

Conclusions on Project
We were able to see history come to life. Never before had either of us completed such an . . . intriguing project. We learned valuable information, but none more so than the importance of propaganda during World War Two. The ability to view actual posters [facilitated] our research efforts. We were able to see, and be affected by, the very same posters that influenced the people of that time, an incredible reality bringing the learning experience to life in a truly worthwhile project.

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