John Harwood - The Wall Street Journal
Karen Tumulty - Time Magazine 
Roger Simon - The Politico.com
David Greene - NPR
David Chalian - ABC News
Nedra Pickler, The Associated Press
Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times


Roger Simon, The Politico.com

Roger Simon is the chief political columnist of The Politico.com. He grew up on the South Side of Chicago where politics was a contact sport.

At The Chicago Sun-Times, where he wrote a column four times a week, Simon was taught that the only way for a journalist to look upon a politician was down. He now fights against that impulse daily.

Simon also has been a columnist for The Baltimore Sun, a White House correspondent for The Chicago Tribune, and the political editor of U.S. News World Report. His column is syndicated to newspapers around the country. He has written columns from Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Egypt, Israel, and South Africa. Simon is a New York Times best-selling author. He has won more than three dozen first-place awards and is the only person to win twice the American Society of Newspaper Editors Distinguished Writing Award for Commentary.

Simon also won the National Headliner Award three times including 2005 for his coverage of the 2004 presidential election. His work has been included in the "Best Newspaper Writing in America" in three different years.

Simon, who has a B.A. degree in English from the University of Illinois, has been a Poynter Media Fellow at Yale University, a Hoover Media Fellow at Stanford University, and in the spring of 2005 was a Kennedy School of Government Institute of Politics Fellow at Harvard University. He was also inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame, whose members include Carl Sandburg, Ben Hecht, Ring Lardner, and Mike Royko.

When Simon dies, he intends to be buried in Chicago, so he can still participate in the politics of that city.

Karen Tumulty, Time Magazine

Karen Tumulty was named a national political correspondent for Time Magazine in 2001. She joined the magazine in 1994.

Tumulty has written more than 25 cover stories for Time, the most recent of which include the kickoff to the 2008 presidential campaign, a report on President Bush’s role in the 2006 election, and a profile of Senator Hillary Clinton. She contributes regularly to Time.com’s political blog, “Swampland,” and has also held positions with Time as congressional correspondent and White House correspondent.

Before joining Time, Tumulty spent 14 years with The Los Angeles Times, where she covered a wide variety of beats. During her time there, she reported on Congress, business, energy, and economics out of Los Angeles, New York, and Washington.

In 1982, Tumulty was awarded the Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism, and, in 1993, she won the National Press Foundation Edwin Hood Award for Diplomatic Correspondence.

Tumulty is a native of San Antonio, Tex., where she began her career at the now-defunct San Antonio Light. She holds a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Texas-Austin and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

Tumulty is married to Paul Richter, who covers the State Department for The Los Angeles Times. They have two sons, Nicholas and Jack.

John Harwood, The Wall Street Journal and CNBC

John Harwood is chief Washington correspondent for CNBC and senior contributing writer for The Wall Street Journal.

Harwood was born in Louisville, Ky., and grew up in the Maryland suburbs outside of the nation's capital. While still in high school, he began his journalism career as a copy-boy at the Washington Star. He studied history and economics at Duke University and graduated magna cum laude in 1978. Following graduation Harwood joined The St. Petersburg Times, reporting on police, investigative projects, local government, and politics. Later he became state capital correspondent, Washington correspondent, and political editor. His assignments ranged from presidential campaigns to unrest against the apartheid regime in South Africa, which he visited three times during the 1980s.

In 1989, Harwood was named a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he spent the 1989-90 academic year. In 1991, he joined The Wall Street Journal as White House correspondent, covering the administration of the George H. W. Bush. Later Harwood reported on Congress. In 1997, he became the Journal’s Political Editor and chief political correspondent.

Harwood writes the newspaper’s political column, Washington Wire, and oversees The Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll. In March 2006, he joined CNBC as chief Washington correspondent.

In addition to CNBC, Harwood offers political analysis on NBC's "Meet the Press" and PBS's "Washington Week in Review," among other television and radio programs. Harwood has covered each of the last five presidential elections. He lives with his wife and their three children in Silver Spring, Md.


David Greene, NPR
David Greene joined NPR in February 2005 as a White House correspondent. Teaming up with Don Gonyea, who has been NPR's White House correspondent since 2001, Greene's coverage of President George W. Bush, and the policies and people at the White House, can be heard on NPR programs including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Day to Day, and Talk of the Nation.

To keep tabs on the president, Greene has traveled everywhere from Baghdad to Biloxi. He flew to Iraq with President Bush in June 2006 on a trip that was kept secret until the president was on the ground and zipped by helicopter into the Green Zone. Greene followed the president across South America, Asia and Europe. He traveled with Vice President Dick Cheney to Iraq, Pakistan, and Afghanistan and saw Cheney witness an elected Afghan parliament convene for the first time since 1973. Greene also covered First Lady Laura Bush's 2005 trip to Botswana, South Africa, Tanzania, and Rwanda.

Before joining NPR, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for The Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House for the Sun during Bush's first term, reporting on the president's response to the Sept. 11 attacks, and his management of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. During the summer and fall of 2004, Greene covered the president's re-election campaign.

Greene previously served as an education writer, reporting from the Sun's bureau in Carroll County, Md. He joined the paper in 1998 as a researcher in the Washington bureau, contributing to the paper's coverage of President Bill Clinton's impeachment trial.

A native of Lancaster, Pa., Greene spent much of his childhood in Pittsburgh. He remains a rabid Pittsburgh Steelers fan and spends Sunday afternoons dressed in black and gold, waving a Steelers "Terrible Towel" while yelling at a television set. Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson.

In his free time, Greene participates in the Coaching for College program, tutoring inner-city youth who need extra help in their schoolwork and in life. He was named co-volunteer of the year for the program in 2004. He also enjoys skiing or sailing, depending on the season. Greene lives in Washington, D.C., with his fiancé.

David Chalian, ABC News

David Chalian is the political director for ABC News. In this role, he helps to oversee the editorial content of all political news across ABC News’ broadcasts and platforms. Chalian co-anchors “Politics Live,” a daily political program on ABC News Now, the network’s 24-hour digital outlet. He is also a regular contributor to the “This Week All Week” webcast with George Stephanopoulos.

In addition, Chalian provides regular political commentary for ABC News Radio and NewsOne, the network’s affiliate news service.

Prior to his current assignment, Chalian was ABC News’ deputy political director. In that role, he co-authored the well-respected online morning political news summary, “The Note.”  His commentary and analysis was also heard on “The AfterNote,” a daily podcast from the ABC News political unit to which he was a regular contributor.

Chalian covered the 2004 presidential election cycle from the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary to the national conventions, debates, and election night returns. During that time, he reported for all ABC News platforms, including “World News Tonight,” “Good Morning America,” “Nightline,” “This Week with George Stephanopoulos,” ABC News Radio, abcnews.com, and ABC News Now.  He also co-anchored “Battlegrounds” from the Republican National Convention, a weeklong series focused on the battleground states.

He joined the network in March 2003 as a field producer with the political unit based in New York.

Prior to joining ABC News, Chalian produced “Inside City Hall,” a widely acclaimed nightly political program for NY1 News. There he covered the 2001 New York City mayoral campaign, the 2002 gubernatorial campaign in New York, and the tragic events of Sept. 11.

Chalian resides in Washington, D.C. He is a graduate of Northwestern University, where he majored in theatre and political science.

Nedra Pickler, The Associated Press

Nedra Pickler has spent her entire career with The Associated Press.

As White House correspondent for the AP, she was the lead reporter covering Democrats in the 2004 presidential election. She began her coverage in the early days of the primary race and ended it with 10 months on the road with nominee John Kerry.

A native of Flint, Mich., Pickler graduated in 1998 from Michigan State University with a BA in Journalism. She interned with The Detroit Free Press and was hired by the Detroit offices of AP as a legislative reporter shortly after graduation.

In March 2000, she transferred from the Lansing bureau to the Washington, D.C., bureau as the Michigan regional reporter, covering the state's congressional delegation and regulation of the auto industry. While there, she received the annual John L. Dougherty award for her work covering Michigan's congressional delegation.

Pickler was promoted to the AP's national political staff in December 2002. She worked as a White House correspondent until September 2006, leaving to cover national politics, including the 2008 presidential election.

Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times

Jeff Zeleny is a political correspondent in the Washington Bureau of The New York Times. He joined the newspaper in September 2006, covering the midterm elections and the new Democratic majority in Congress. He is a member of the paper’s 2008 presidential campaign team.

Zeleny came to Times from The Chicago Tribune, where he worked as the national political correspondent for more than five years. He was the lead writer of the 2004 presidential race. Later, he chronicled the first year of Sen. Barack Obama's time in Washington, producing the first draft of his rise through a narrative five-part series in 2005. Zeleny also covered the White House after Sept. 11, 2001, and has reported from 40 states and more than a dozen countries, including China, Japan, Russia, and Africa.

He joined the newspaper in 2000 as a reporter on the Metropolitan desk in Chicago, where he was a member of the reporting team that won a Pulitzer Prize in explanatory journalism for documenting gridlock in the nation's air traffic system.

Zeleny came to the Tribune from the Des Moines Register, where he covered the 2000 Iowa presidential caucuses, the state Legislature and the courts. He graduated from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1996, where he studied news-editorial journalism and political science, and completed internships at The Florida Times-Union, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and The Wall Street Journal. He also worked at The Associated Press and the Lincoln Journal Star.

Zeleny, a native of Nebraska, lives in Washington. He regularly appears on a variety of television news programs.

Contact: Office of Communications

Posted Oct. 8, 2006
Updated Oct. 15, 2007
Updated Oct. 18, 2007

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