Ann Kirwin Anderson '87 earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree majoring in International Relations and Spanish. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, she graduated Magna Cum Laude from Bucknell University and went on to become an honors graduate of the University of Connecticut School of Law. Anderson currently practices tax law and is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Legal Studies at Quinnipiac University.

While at Bucknell, Anderson was a two-time Academic All-American basketball player who was the first woman to score 1,000 points in her basketball career at Bucknell. Her 1,343 career points and 707 career rebounds currently rank her 7th in both categories in the Bison record books. A recipient of the Jay P. Mathius Memorial Scholarship, she was a two-time team captain who participated in multiple university and athletic department committees during her four years on campus. Prior to graduation she was named the East Coast Conference Scholar Athlete for women's basketball and was awarded the university's Christy Mathewson Award as the outstanding senior athlete and the Eleanor Decker Prize for contributions to the university community. She was inducted into the Bucknell Hall of Fame in 1998.

Following her Bucknell career, Anderson played two seasons for Eintracht Frankfurt, a German First League professional women's basketball team. She also coached the club's high school team to an appearance in the German Final Four.

Anderson currently serves as the assistant girls' basketball coach at Haddam-Killingworth High School and she has served in leadership positions on the Board of Directors of numerous community organizations. She and her husband Eric reside in Killingworth, Connecticut with their five children, Emily, Kiley, Brinley, Molly, and Bryce.

Close

Places I've Been

The following links are virtual breadcrumbs marking the 27 most recent pages you have visited in Bucknell.edu. If you want to remember a specific page forever click the pin in the top right corner and we will be sure not to replace it. Close this message.