October 06, 2011


By Kathryn Kopchik

LEWISBURG, Pa. — Bucknell University will host a screening of the film, "Renewal," on Thursday, Oct. 13, at 5:30 p.m. in the Forum of the Elaine Langone Center.

The screening, which is free and open to the public, is co-sponsored by the Office of Civic Engagement, the Economics Department, and Hillel as part of the "Feeding our Hearts: Expanding our Vision Initiative."

Caretakers of the Earth
A 90-minute documentary by Marty Ostrow and Terry Kay Rockefeller, "Renewal" is the first feature-length documentary film to capture the vitality and diversity of today's religious-environmental activists.

From within their Christian, Jewish, Buddhist and Muslim traditions, Americans are becoming caretakers of the Earth, re-examining what it means to be human and how we live on this planet.

The film includes eight stories of people of all faiths combating such issues as the devastation of mountaintop removal in Appalachia; Muslim tradition and charity forging bonds between urban communities and sustainable farms in Illinois; the joining of environmental education and Jewish tradition in Connecticut; a Buddhist community in northern California that is leading a campaign to save trees; and the combined efforts of Catholics and Native Americans to protect New Mexico's land and water.

Author, educator and environmentalist Bill McKibben says of the documentary, "The religious environmental movement is potentially key to dealing with the greatest problem humans have ever faced, and it has never been captured with more breadth and force than in 'Renewal.' I hope this movie is screened in church basements and synagogue social halls across the country, and that it moves many more people of faith off the fence and into action."

Year-long initiative at Bucknell
This film screening is part of a year-long initiative focused on food access and security. "Feeding Our Hearts, Expanding Our Vision" has the intention of increasing resources for local food programs that serve the needy as well as reducing food waste on campus.

The initiative was developed in response to a White House challenge issued to colleges and universities to create opportunities among people of different faith traditions and those with no religious affiliation as they work together on a common project for the public good.

Other events in the initiative include the talk, "The Food Not Eaten," by journalist Jonathan Bloom on Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. in Trout Auditorium of the Vaughan Literature Building. Bloom is the author of American Wasteland: How America Throws Away Nearly Half its Food (and What We Can Do about it), which chronicles how Americans waste food from farm to fork and examines the impact of this squandering.

Contact: Division of Communications

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