Fall 2015

Thursday, Sept. 17, 4:30 p.m., Academic West 114

CSREG Faculty Colloquium - Rhonda Sharpe (Economics). 
"I'm Every Woman: Income Distribution by Race and Ethnicity"

Thursday, Sept. 24, 4:30 p.m., 111 Coleman Hall

CSREG/Women's and Gender Studies OPEN HOUSE. 

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m., Gallery Theatre (LC 301)

Dennis Dalton (specialist in the colonial and post-colonial political history of India and renowned expert on Mahatma Gandhi and civil disobedience.)  
"Gandhi and Forgiveness." 

Gandhi practiced the value of forgiveness as a method of conflict resolution.  He derived this idea from the world's great religious traditions.  He applied it to his leadership of the Indian independence movement and later to attaining peace in the face of Hindu-Muslim civil war.  This lecture will explain how he urged forgiveness of British atrocities following the Amritsar massacre of 1919 and then through his Calcutta fast for religious unity in 1947.  Reference will also be made to similar acts of forgiveness by Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1956 during the Montgomery bus boycott." Co-sponsored by CSREG

Tuesday, Oct. 20, 4:30 p.m., Willard Smith Library (VL 125)

CSREG Faculty Colloquium - James Haile (Philosophy). 
"Ta-Nehisi Coates: quantum matter and the phenomenology of the body"

Thursday, Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m.  Sex/Body/Self

A performance and talk by internationally renowned performer and activist, Tim Miller

Internationally-acclaimed solo performer Tim Miller will perform excerpts from his work and speak about the role performance plays in constellating identity. Known for his charged performance work which takes up the most challenging social texts of our time, Miller will share fierce and funny performance material as well as speak about how performance can be used to embolden communities and connect people with one another. Co-sponsored by CSREG

Sunday, Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m., Tustin Studio Theatre.

Performance - Fierce Diverse Voices
A performance by Bucknell Students in Workshop with Tim Miller.

Tim Miller, internationally renowned performance artist and social activist, together with students from across the disciplines at Bucknell, will share a variety of original performances created in workshop from the tremendous energies and stories that are present in our students' lives. Using their memories and stories as a jumping off point, we will see where a deep sense of personal history creates performance that jumps out from the body onto the stage. Actors will work intensively for a week workshopping with Tim Miller and present an ensemble-generated public performance. Please bring your hearts and brains, hopes and fears. Co-sponsored by CSREG

Wednesday, Nov. 4, 7:00 p.m., LC Forum

29th Annual Black Experiences Lecture. 
Lani Guineer (Harvard Law)   "The Tyranny of the Meritocracy"

In her talk, "The Tyranny of the Meritocracy," Harvard Law School professor and pioneering civil rights advocate Lani Guinier critiques university merit systems that privilege the elite and offers a blueprint for nurturing student potential that promises to better serve the challenges of a twenty-first century world. Drawing on current case studies, as well as her many years observing the experiences of minority and female students at the universities where she has taught, Guinier charts how current views of merit often lead to narrower learning experiences, suppress leadership potential, and discourage the collaborative approaches that have repeatedly proven the best way to solve problems, from the classroom to the professional and political spheres.

Tuesday, Nov. 10, 4:30 p.m.,  Willard Smith Library (VL 125)

CSREG Faculty Colloquium - Ketaki Pant (ASIANetwork Post-doc)
"Homes of Capital: Merchants across Indian Ocean Gujarat"

Tuesday, Nov. 17, 7 p.m., Academic West 108 

Jack Tchen, Founding director, A/P/A Institute;
Department of Social and Cultural Analysis; and The Gallatin School of Individualized Study, New York University. 
"Haunting the American Dream:  Eugenics, Meritocracy, Spatial Sorting & the Origins of Our Present Crisis" 

In this talk, Jack Tchen will look at how post Civil War America was re-territorialized along hierarchies of those deemed "fit" and superior and those deemed "unfit" and devalued. Racial profiling, our ongoing segregation, high stakes testing, and cycles of urban displacement have deep historical roots in Jim Crow America. Eugenics sorting, bureaucracies, and big data became the modern organizational form of a new regime of valuation, sorting, and spatial segregation.  Co-sponsored by CSREG

Faculty Colloquia

The CSREG faculty colloquia series enables Bucknell faculty to present their ongoing research and works-in-progress to fellow faculty members and students.

Fall presenters include Rhonda Sharpe (economics), James Haile (Philosophy), and Ketaki Pant (ASIANetwork-LUCE Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow).

See the full schedule

Reading Groups

The Center provides funds and support for both ongoing reading groups and groups associated with particular speakers or events.

A spring reading group, organized by Prof. Amy McCready (political science), discussed Our Bodies: Whose Property by Anne Phillips. 

Learn more about our reading groups
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