Federico Fridman received his Ph.D. in Romance Studies with a concentration in Latin American Literature from Cornell University in 2014. Before coming to the U.S., he taught at the Law School and in the Political Science Department at the University of Buenos Aires. His research interests include Latin American literature (with an emphasis on Mexican literature and Southern Cone literature), literary theory, cultural studies, political theory, European continental philosophy, and trans-Atlantic studies. He is currently working on a book manuscript titled: "Secrecy and Community in Latin American Literature."

Selected Publications

"Tightening the Circle: Alfonso Reyes and the Formation of a Pan-American Intelligentsia During the Inter-War Period." Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos (forthcoming).

 "The Impolitical Dimension in Jorge Luis Borges' Literature: A Gaze on the Impossible for Politics through Roberto Esposito's thought," in Exploring the Political Thought of Roberto Esposito. Eds. Antonio Calcagno and Inna Virasova. New York: SUNY Press. (forthcoming).  

"Deciphering Macedonio Fernández' project to found an alternative community" in Museo de la Novela de la Eterna (Primera novela buena)," in Alternative Communities in Contemporary Latin American and Iberian Literature. Eds. Luis H. Castañeda and Javier González. U.K.: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2016, 174-196.  

"José Martí entre dos crónicas: Presiones editoriales y la autonomía relativa de la producción del escritor modernista." Revista Literaturas Modernas, 2014. Vol. 44, N° 2, 91‐122.  

"Derivas de Poeta Ciego de Mario Bellatín," in Salón de anomalías. Diez lecturas críticas acerca de la obra de Mario Bellatín. Ed. Salvador Luis Raggio. Lima: Ediciones Altazor, 2013, 193-209.

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