In our conversations with policy makers and the people who advise them, we have learned that one of the most important skills that students should develop, whether they want to work in public policy or in the private sector, is the construction of a concise, informative, but persuasive policy memo.

How do you persuade a policy maker? You identify a specific policy issue that is important to this policy maker; you construct an argument (s) to plead your case; you collect evidence to support your argument (s); and you anticipate the most likely counter-argument (s) and address them as well.

Best of the Best Policy Memos from UNIV 221: Bend the Curve, fall 2013

To: Urban Patients
From: Felix Boakye-Afriyie    
Re: What you should know about your physicians

To: Healthcare providers
From: Felix Boakye-Afriyie    
Re: Preventing medical error through the Provencare system

To: Physicians
From: Felix Boakye-Afriyie
Re: Investing time in Patients’ lives to promote better care

To: Local Organizations
From: Emily Beisser
Topic: Community Health Care

To: Administrators
From: Jennifer Ohn
Success of Electronic Health Records Depends on Social Reengineering

To: Physicians
From: Jennifer Ohn
OpenNotes and PCR Benefits

To: Policy Makers
From: Raïssa S. Sorgho
Re: Policy Makers and End of Life Care

To: Employers and Employees
From: Raïssa S. Sorgho
Re. Employers, Employees & Workplace Wellness Programs

To: Citizens and Pennsylvanians
From: Raïssa S. Sorgho
Re. Citizens (Pennsylvanians) and the Affordable Care Act

 

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