Professors: Katherine M. Faull, Angèle Kingué, James E. Lavine (Director, Linguistics Program), Peter Morris-Keitel, Slava I. Yastremski (Director, Russian Studies Program)

Associate Professors: Philippe Dubois (Director, French and Francophone Studies Program), Renée K. Gosson, Elaine Hopkins, Bernhard Kuhn (Director, Italian Studies Program),Ludmila S. Lavine, Helen G. Morris-Keitel (Director, German Studies Program), John E. Westbrook (Chair)

Assistant Professors: Logan Connors, Juliette Dade, (visiting), Nathalie Dupont, Bastian Heinsohn, Martin Isleem (Director, Arabic Studies Program), Nicholas Kupensky (visiting), Heidi Lorimor, Anna Paparcone, Lisa Perrone (adjunct), Or Rogovin (visiting)

Learning a foreign language contributes to a liberal education by providing performative exercises in cultural practices and linguistic concepts that open up new perspectives on what it means to be human. Furthermore, foreign-language courses allow access to world views expressed in the target language on their own linguistic and cultural terms, thus also making possible a more profound reflection on one's own source language and culture. The Department of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics' offerings at all levels investigate and analyze important interconnections between the histories, society, cultures, and languages among the people that speak Arabic, French, German, Hebrew, Italian and Russian, as well as offering students an introduction to American Sign Language and Deaf Culture. The curricula within the Department of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics asserts the importance of attaining fluency not only in the target language but also in the nuances of interpreting the target language's literatures and other modes of cultural production.

The goal of the Department of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics is to allow students to achieve competency and literacy in the target language in order to employ that target language in a range of intellectual and professional contexts. The department's mission is firmly supported by the study of current thinking in linguistics where language is analyzed as a phenomenon in itself. Courses in linguistics link the study of human language to the cognitive underpinning of language acquisition and production in both the source and target cultures.

The department offers courses in six modern languages, in American Sign Language, and in linguistics. Language courses are regularly offered in Arabic, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Russian, and on occasion in other Slavic languages.

Coursework in all the programs is designed to promote a level of language proficiency and cultural understanding that will enable students to be active participants in a shrinking multicultural world. Each program's curriculum features a sequence of courses focusing on the development of language skills, at the lower level, followed by a transition to upper-level courses that focus on the appreciation and critical analysis of a wide variety of literary and cultural works. As the Goals 2000 document of the National Standards in Foreign Language Education states: "Knowing another language system, another culture, and communication strategies, enables students to access new information and knowledge, develop insight into their own language and culture, and participate in multilingual communities and a global society."

Students are strongly encouraged to continue or begin the study of the language(s)/culture(s) of their choice as early in their undergraduate career as possible. Doing so will ensure the possibility of completing a major or minor in the language and will open the door to many stimulating study abroad programs. Many students find that the study of other languages and cultures provides a good background for work in other disciplines. In addition, by working to an advanced level of language proficiency and cultural awareness, students may improve their chances for a Fulbright or other international fellowships after graduation.

Placement: French, German, Italian, and Russian: First-year students with prior instruction or background in French, German, Italian, and/or Russian should take the on-line placement examination before arriving at Bucknell regardless of whether they have taken the AP exam or the SAT II. Information on accessing this exam is included in the first-year student registration materials. Any questions regarding placement should be directed to the program directors.

Arabic: First-year students with prior instruction or background in Arabic or Russian should contact the chair of the department (Arabic) and/or the program director (Russian) to consult about the appropriate placement level.

World Literature (in English): EAST 211 Premodern Japanese Literature in Translation; EAST 212 Modern Japanese Literature in Translation; EAST 213 Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation; RUSS 211 Chekhov: Drama in Prose; RUSS 330 Nabakov and His Worlds; RUSS 250 Of Crime and Punishment: 19th-century Russian Literature; RUSS 255 The Politics of Writing: 20th-century Russian Literature; RUSS 325 Dostoevsky and Tolstoy: Literary Philosophy. For descriptions, see the respective programs of the Department of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, and the Department of East Asian Studies.

 

German Studies (GRMN)

German Studies provides an integrated and interdisciplinary approach to the study of German language, the analysis of artifacts of German culture — literature, art, music, film, etc. — and the use of German for special purposes, for example, in a business setting.

Coursework in the discipline combines the achievement of greater language proficiency in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening with a basic knowledge of German culture and methods of critical interpretation. There have been major thinkers in almost every field from physics to philosophy, economics, or psychology who were German-speakers, and today, Germany contributes significantly to political, cultural, and economic developments in Europe. German Studies also furthers critical thinking skills while fostering cross-cultural understanding.

The German Studies program has as its goal that all majors achieve an intermediate-high to advanced-low proficiency in the areas of linguistic and cultural knowledge. This means that German majors can communicate not only about daily needs but that they also can understand and articulate positions on social, literary, or cultural topics with a reasonable amount of linguistic accuracy. This is to say that as students progress through the major they learn various theoretical approaches to the interpretation of cultural artifacts and must, therefore, keep working on their German language skills in order to acquire the vocabulary and syntax necessary to express more complicated ideas and concepts. In general, students' comprehension skills, reading and listening, are further developed than their production skills, speaking and writing, when finishing the major. Additional aspects inherent to this goal include increasing students' understanding of the way in which cultural artifacts, literature, film, theater, music, art, advertising, etc., are embedded in a historical context which determines gender, class, and race relations within the target culture(s). Simultaneously, comparisons and contrasts are made in regard to the learners' own cultural background(s) in order to foster cross-cultural understanding.

All German majors will work on developing their skills in writing by taking at least two writing-intensive courses (W2) in the major: GRMN 204 Conversation and Composition and GRMN 230: Genre and History: Introduction to German Studies. In addition, every course in the major will include a variety of writing assignments, reaction papers, arguments in regard to a specific question, and/or research papers. In every course a student takes at Bucknell that counts toward the major, students will give at least one oral presentation (either individually or in a group). All of the courses that count toward the major are discussion-oriented so that students get plenty of opportunities to develop their abilities to articulate their interpretation of the material at hand, to ask questions of others, and to respond to questions. The oral and written work will require students to consult on-line German resources, scholarly journals, and other print materials. In GRMN 230: Genre and History: Introduction to German Studies students will receive discipline-specific instruction on how to locate, to evaluate, and to use scholarly information in the field of German Studies. These skills will be reviewed and refined in other 200- and 300-level courses.

A major in German may provide the basis for graduate work within the field. Moreover, German is considered a useful second language in many disciplines in the humanities, such as philosophy or art history. In combination with other majors, such as economics, international relations or management, a German major can prepare one for a career in international business or law or in the foreign service.

The major in German consists of the equivalent of seven full-credit courses plus one .25-credit culminating experience course at the GRMN 204 level and above. Four of these courses must meet specific requirements: Conversation and Composition (GRMN 204 or its equivalent), one course dealing with German cultural issues (GRMN 270, 272, 273 or its equivalent), a course focusing on the methods of German Studies (GRMN 230 or its equivalent), and at least two courses at Bucknell at the 300 level, only one of which may be independent study. GRMN 201-202 (Strategies in Speaking German) and GRMN 310 (German for Reading Knowledge) are not applicable to the major in German. The culminating experience in German Studies can be fulfilled in one of three ways: an Honors thesis in German Studies, a .25 course that results in a presentation at the annual German Studies mini-conference, or an approved course in the Department of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics that brings together students from the various majors in the department. In most instances, students will enroll in the culminating experience course in the spring of their senior year.

German majors are strongly urged to participate in a study abroad program approved by Bucknell's German Studies program. The benefits of such a total immersion experience in attaining linguistic and cultural proficiency cannot be overemphasized. Many abroad programs also offer internship experiences. Students interested in study abroad should consult the faculty of the German Studies program at the earliest possible date.

All majors who meet the requirements set by the Honors Council and who wish to earn honors in German are encouraged to do so. Students interested in writing an Honors Thesis should contact a German faculty member early in the second semester of their junior year to discuss the process and to define a topic.

German majors and minors should supplement their study of German with work in other languages, European history, art history, music, philosophy, or work in European political science and economics.

Students planning to teach German at the secondary level should consult with the German Studies program and Bucknell's department of education as soon as possible.

The minor in German consists of the equivalent of five full-credit courses at the GRMN 101 level or above. There are no other specific course requirements for the minor. Students interested in minoring in German should consult a German Studies program faculty member for the appropriate sequencing of courses. GRMN 201-202 (Strategies in Speaking German) and GRMN 310 (German for Reading Knowledge) do count towards the minor. German minors also are strongly encouraged to participate in an approved study abroad program.

The College of Engineering has approved a German minor that consists of the equivalent of five full-credit courses at the GRMN 103 level or above. A required course for this minor is GRMN 225 German for Engineers and Natural Scientists. Students interested in this minor should consult Professor Helen Morris-Keitel for the appropriate sequencing of courses. GRMN 201-202 (Strategies in Speaking German) and GRMN 310 (Reading for German Knowledge) do count toward the minor.

101A.  Intensive Elementary German (II; 4, 2) One and a half course.
Intensive practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing German. Introduction to everyday German culture. Successful completion meets the prerequisite for GRMN 103.

101.  Exploring Your World -- elementary level I (I; 4, 0)
Beginning language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing; elementary grammar, and introduction to German culture. Prerequisite: juniors and seniors by permission only.

102.  Everyday Life in Germany -- elementary level II (II; 4, 0)
Continuation of language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing; grammar; reading in culture and literature. Prerequisite: GRMN 101 or equivalent.

103.  Building Proficiency in German -- intermediate level I (I; 4, 0)
A continuation and review of basic grammar, emphasizing all four language skills and culture. Prerequisite: GRMN 102 or equivalent.

104.  Communicating in Context -- intermediate level II (II; 4, 0)
Review of basic grammar, emphasizing all four language skills and culture. Prerequisite: GRMN 103 or equivalent.

127.  128. Intermediate German, Part A and Part B (I and II; 2, 0) Half course.
Together these courses will provide students with the skills covered in the one-semester course GRMN 103. Prerequisite: GRMN 102 or equivalent.

201.  202. Strategies in Speaking German (I and II; R; 2, 0) Half course.
Concentration on development of speaking skills. Conducted in German by native speaker. Intended for students enrolled in 200- and 300-level courses. Prerequisite: GRMN 103 or equivalent.

204.  German Conversation and Composition (I; 3, 0)
Intensive practice in speaking and writing German. Prerequisite: GRMN 104 or equivalent. 

221.  Doing Business in Germany (I; 3, 0)
Development of skills necessary to function in the German business world. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

225.  German for Engineers and Natural Scientists (I or II; 2, 0) Half course.
Introduction to concepts and vocabulary pertinent to these disciplines as well as discussion of the "culture" of engineering and science in German-speaking countries. Prerequisite: GRMN 103 or equivalent.

230.  Genre and History: Introduction to German Studies (I; 3, 0)
Examination of a genre and its historical development with an emphasis on developing a critical approach to the reading of texts. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

231.  Reading German Literature (AI; R; 3, 0)
Intended to sharpen the critical skills developed in GRMN 230 and provide students with more in-depth knowledge of a particular genre. Prerequisite: GRMN 204.

240.  Reflections of Science and Technology in German Culture (I or II; 3, 0)
An overview of German cultural responses to technological and scientific progress from the early 1800s to the present. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

251.  Achtung Kamera (I; 2, 2)

This course is an introduction to German film studies. It provides a survey of German films from the beginning until today. Prerequisite: GRMN 204.

261.  Nazi Culture (I; 3, 0)

A study of Nazi attitudes towards the arts, science, education, mass media, work, morality, sex, war, and religion. In English. Crosslisted as UNIV 261.

270.  The Bourgeois Era: 19th-century Germany (AII; 3, 0)
An overview of German society from Romanticism to World War I from a cultural-historical perspective.  In German or English. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

272.  Modern German Culture 1945-1990 (AII; 3, 0)
An overview of cultural, social, economic, and political issues in the two Germanys. In German. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

273.  The Berlin Republic since 1990 (AII; 3, 0)
Exploration of the cultural world of Germany since unification including literature, art, film, music. In German. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

295.  Topics in German Studies (II; R; 3, 0)
Study of topics in German culture or literature at an intermediate level. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

296.  Advanced German Composition (II; R; 3, 0)
Concentration on the writing of analytic German. Advanced level. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

310.  German for Reading Knowledge (I or II; 3, 0)
Students will learn grammatical structures and vocabulary necessary to read German-language  texts in their disciplines. In English. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

318.  Contemporary German Cinema (AI or AII; 3, 0)
Analysis of contemporary German cinema. Advanced level.

322.  Leitmotifs in 19th-century German Culture (I or II; 3, 0)
Examination of how German-speaking writers, artists, and composers use a specific form and/or address a specific issue at various points throughout the 19th century. Prerequisite: GRMN 230 or equivalent.

328.  The Cold War in Germany (I; 3, 0)
Analysis of Cold War politics and literature in East and West Germany, 1945 to 1990 and beyond. In German. Prerequisite: GRMN 230 or equivalent.

329.  German Literature in the 20th and 21st Centuries (I or II; 3, 0)
Analysis and interpretation of major literary works. In German. Prerequisite: GRMN 204 or equivalent.

390.  Independent Projects in German Studies (I and II; R) Half to full course.
Subject to be selected by student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

392.  Advanced Seminar in Selected Literary Topics (I or II; R; 3, 0)
The course will deal with selected topics in German literature on an advanced level. In German. Prerequisite: GRMN 230 or equivalent.

393.  Advanced Seminar in Selected Cultural Topics (AI and AII; R; 3, 0)
The course will deal with selected topics in German culture on an advanced level. In German. Prerequisite: GRMN 270 or GRMN 272 or GRMN 273 or equivalent.

419.  Culminating Experience (II) Quarter course.
Independent study with a faculty member to prepare an oral presentation for annual German Studies Mini-Conference. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

 

Department of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics (DLCL)

210.  Inventing Modern Europe (I; 3, 0)
Important events in history, politics, economics, the arts and sciences which have contributed to the formation of Modern Europe and the process of integration and unification.

215.  Arab World and Globalization (AII; R; 3, 0)
The course focuses on the effects of Globalization on the Arabic language, identity, media, women's status, and political activism in the Arab World.

 

American Sign Language (SIGN)

101.  102. Elementary American Sign Language I and II (I and II; 2, 0) Half course.
An introduction to American Sign Language. Training and practice in signing together with approaches to communicating with deaf people. SIGN 101 or equivalent is prerequisite for SIGN 102.

 

Arabic Studies (ARBC)

101.  Beginning Arabic (I or II; 3, 1)
Beginning language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Elementary grammar. Introduction to Arabic culture.

102.  Beginning Arabic II (I or II; 3, 1)
Continuation of Arabic language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: ARBC 101 or equivalent.

103.  Intermediate Arabic I (I or II; 3, 1)
A continuation and review of basic grammar, emphasizing all four language skills and culture. Prerequisite: ARBC 102 or equivalent.

104.  Intermediate Arabic II (I or II; 3, 1)
Review of basic grammar with an emphasis on all four language skills and culture. Prerequisite: ARBC 103 or equivalent.

105.  Intensive Intermediate Arabic I (I or II; 4, 1)
Continuation of Arabic language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisite: ARBC 101 or equivalent.

201.  Intermediate Arabic Conversation I (I; 2, 0) Half course.
Concentration on development of speaking skills. Conducted entirely in Arabic by native speaker. Prerequisite: ARBC 102.

202.  Intermediate Arabic Conversation II (II; 2, 0) Half course.
Concentration on development of speaking skills. Conducted entirely in Arabic by native speaker. Prerequisite: ARBC 103.

203.  Unveiling the Hijab’s Culture (AI or AII; 3, 0)
An introductory cultural course to various aspects of the Muslim and Arab world to get a deep look at the Middle Eastern culture and customs.

250.  Topics in Arabic Studies (I or II; 3, 0)
Study of topics in Arabic language, cultures, and societies. Prerequisite: ARBC 102 or equivalent. 

301.  Advanced Topics in Arabic (I or II; R) Half to full course.
Advanced Arabic independent study under the direction and supervision of an instructor. Topics to be selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

 

French and Francophone Studies (FREN)

French and Francophone Studies start with the acquisition of the linguistic and cultural skills needed to communicate in spoken and written French. As the students' skills advance, French courses increasingly emphasize humanistic study of the literatures and civilizations of France and other French-speaking countries around the world. French and Francophone Studies, especially when they include study abroad, offer direct access to the perspectives and attitudes of closely related, yet distinctly different cultures. This knowledge and experience help students to gain greater awareness of themselves and their own culture and to acquire the cross-cultural skills so valuable in our diverse and shrinking world.

French is one of the most widespread international languages after English, and proficiency in French is a valuable asset for students seeking a career in a wide variety of fields including advertising, business, banking, publishing, teaching in a secondary school, translating, interpreting, foreign service, and tourism. The major also prepares students to go on to graduate school in literature, linguistics, civilization, or foreign language pedagogy. In addition, French is a useful, at times essential, language in disciplines such as art history, music, or philosophy.

The French and Francophone Studies major is best seen as a progression of linguistic-cultural study organized in four stages. One hundred-level courses focus on language proficiency in cultural context. Two hundred-level courses consolidate language skills while beginning a more systematic study of French and Francophone literatures and cultures. A year or semester in France provides direct experience in the French culture. Three hundred-level courses focus on specific topics in literature, civilization, and cultural studies.

All French and Francophone Studies majors have the opportunity to satisfy the W1 requirement by taking FREN 150, one of the core required courses for the major, and the highest level into which an incoming student may place on the placement exam. In addition, French and Francophone Studies majors will complete two W2 courses in the 200-level literature and culture courses required for the major. A variety of written assignments ranging from journals to reaction papers to exams and research papers will be part of all courses at the 200- and 300-levels. In every course counting toward the major, students will give at least one formal oral presentation. As with the writing process, explicit in-class discussions on the mechanics of delivering an effective presentation will be given as needed. Furthermore, courses at the 200- and 300-levels are primarily discussion based, giving students the opportunity to improve their ability to express themselves and construct arguments orally. Through thoughtfully articulated writing assignments, presentations, in-class discussions, and user ed. workshops in the library, French and Francophone Studies majors will hone their research and evaluation skills. They will gain familiarity with discipline-specific journals and databases, and learn to evaluate information sources. As they engage in the critical thinking necessary for successful completion of the major, students will lay the foundation for independent lifelong learning.

The major in French and Francophone Studies consists of a minimum of nine courses at the FREN 104 level or above, excluding FREN 201, 202, 262, 301, and 302. These must include FREN 150, FREN 230, FREN 231, FREN 270 (or FREN 271, or FREN 275), and three courses at the 300-level. In addition, one of the 200- or 300-level courses must focus on literature or culture outside of Hexagonal France (FREN 236, FREN 336, or any topics course with an explicit focus on a Francophone region outside of France).

All majors will complete a Culminating Experience: During the senior year (or second semester of the junior year with permission of their adviser and the program director), majors in French and Francophone Studies will designate as their Culminating Experience one 300-level seminar on a French or Francophone topic taught by a faculty member in the French and Francophone Studies program. As part of the learning activities in that seminar, majors will undertake a paper or research project related to French or Francophone literature or culture. At the end of the semester, they will present the result, both in its final written form and as an oral presentation in French based on their research, preferably at a symposium organized by the French and Francophone Studies program on campus. These two components of the Culminating Experience (paper and presentation) must provide evidence of: 1) competency in written and oral communication through structured arguments using appropriate forms of textual, cultural and visual analysis and evidence and 2) familiarity with critical approaches, academic research and methodology in the field of French and Francophone Studies. A committee of French and Francophone Studies faculty will evaluate these Culminating Experiences to determine whether or not they meet both of these two learning objectives and thus satisfy the requirement. With the permission of the French and Francophone Studies adviser, students who are taking an independent study or pursuing honors in French and Francophone Studies may satisfy the Culminating Experience requirement through the successful comple­tion of an Independent Study project or an Honors Thesis. However, in such cases, these students will still be required to do an oral presentation in French based on their research project or thesis in order to provide evidence for the two learning outcomes under examination, as stated above.

The minor in French and Francophone Studies consists of five courses taught in French at the FREN 103 level and beyond, excluding FREN 201, 202, 262, 301, and 302.

Residence abroad is the best way to gain proficiency in the language and knowledge of the culture. Bucknell's own study abroad program, Bucknell en France, located in Tours, can accommodate students at all proficiency levels. Internships can be arranged for advanced students. It is strongly recommended that majors participate in the Bucknell en France program in Tours.

Courses Offered at Bucknell

All students who have had French in high school should take the on-line placement test prior to enrolling for the first time in a course at the 100-level. Instructions can be found at http://www.bucknell.edu/x939.xml or via myBucknell.

 

101.  Discovering French (Elementary level I) (I; 4, 0)
Beginning language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing; elementary grammar; and introduction to French civilization. Prerequisite: no more than two years of secondary school French or permission of the instructor.

102.  Exploring French (Elementary level II) (I and II; 4, 0)
Continuation of language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing; grammar; readings in literature and civilization. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or one year of secondary school French.

103.  Building Proficiency in French (Intermediate level I) (I and II; 4, 0)
A review of basic grammar emphasizing all four language skills and culture. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or equivalent (three years of secondary school French).

104.  Communicating in Context (Intermediate level II) (I and II; 4, 0)
Continuing review of basic grammar emphasizing all four language skills and culture. Prerequisite: FREN 103 or four years of secondary school French.

150.  ĽEcriture fantastique (I and II; 3, 0)
Application of major linguistic functions and acquisition of skills essential for 200-level courses through a series of contextualized writing assignments. Prerequisite: FREN 104 or five years of secondary school French.

201.  202. Intermediate French Conversation I and II (I and II; R; 2, 0) Half courses.
Not open to students who have studied in France or other French-speaking countries. Concentration on development of speaking skill. Conducted entirely in French by native speaker. Intended for students enrolled in 200-level courses. Prerequisite: FREN 104 or FREN 150 or equivalent. (Cannot be applied toward the French major or minor)

230.  French Literature I (I; 3, 0)
Introduction to French literature from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Provides an introduction to literary history and to methods of critical reading. A comprehensive survey. Prerequisite: FREN 150.

231.  French Literature II (II; 3, 0)
Introduction to history of French literature of the 19th century to the present and to methods of literary analysis. Prerequisite: FREN 150.

236.  Topics in Francophone Literature and Culture (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Study of the literature, language, geography, history, music, and film of a particular Francophone region (French Caribbean, Quebec, West Africa, Maghreb, etc.). Prerequisite: FREN 150.

255.  Introduction to French Cinema (I or II; 3, 0)
Introduction to French cinema from a cultural and historical perspective. Students will familiarize themselves with major cinematic movements and with methods of critical reading. The course also includes discussions of the relationships between film, literature, and other visual arts. Prerequisite: FREN 150.

270.  La France actuelle (I or II; 3, 0)
Introduction to contemporary France from historical, sociological, anthropological, and symbolic perspectives. The study of French attitudes, lifestyles, conceptions of society, social and political structures, and of France and French in a post-colonial context. Prerequisite: FREN 150.

271.  La France artistique (I or II; 3, 0)
Introduction to French music, literature, and fine arts from the Middle Ages to the present. Focus on selected artists, writers, and musicians from each period. Provides a comprehensive survey. Prerequisite: FREN 150.

275.  French Economy and Business Culture (II; 3, 2)
In-depth study of the language, culture, politics, and economic climate of business in France. Preparation for further study of management and internships in France. Prerequisite: FREN 150.

295.  Topics in French Studies (I or II) Half to full course.
Topics vary but permit study of one or several subjects in French or Francophone literature, culture, and civilization. Prerequisites: FREN 150 and permission of the instructor.

301.  302. Advanced French Conversation I and II (I and II; 2, 0) Half courses.
Advanced conversation for students who have studied in France or other French-speaking countries. Conducted entirely in French by native speaker. May not be taken by native speakers of French. (Cannot be applied toward the French major or minor)

322.  Medieval and Renaissance Studies (I or II; 3, 0)
Examination of the literature of the medieval and Renaissance periods emphasizing the analysis of themes, ideas, and styles as well as cultural and historical contexts. Prerequisite: FREN 230 or permission of the instructor.

324.  Seventeenth-Century Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Topics deal with aspects of Louis XIV's classical aesthetic. Examination and analysis of its literary, artistic, and cultural manifestations, its socio-political and philosophical underpinnings, and its counter-culture: the salon tradition. Prerequisite: FREN 230 or permission of the instructor.

325.  Eighteenth-Century Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Topics vary, but deal with aspects of the literary, artistic, and intellectual manifestations of the decline of the Ancient Regime and the liberation of thought initiated by the pre-Revolutionary philosophies. Prerequisite: FREN 230 or permission of the instructor.

326.  Nineteenth-Century Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Topics vary, but inevitably focus on the interaction of Romantic imagination and Realist observation that characterizes the 19th century in France. Prerequisite: FREN 231 or permission of the instructor.

327.  Twentieth-Century Studies (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Topics vary and could focus on a period, a genre, a group of writers, or a theme from the 20th or 21st century. Prerequisite: FREN 231 or permission of the instructor.

330.  Topics in Literature (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Advanced study of themes or topics in French or Francophone literature. Prerequisite: FREN 230, FREN 231 or permission of the instructor.

336.  Francophone Africa (AI or AII; 3, 0)
Study of literature, film, politics, and society of Francophone Africa. Prerequisite: FREN 230, FREN 231, FREN 235, FREN 236, FREN 270, or FREN 271.

370.  Topics in Civilization (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Advanced study in themes, topics, or periods in French or Francophone history or civilization. Prerequisite: FREN 270 or permission of the instructor.

371.  Topics in the Arts (I or II; R; 3, 0)
Advanced study in themes, topics, or periods of French art history. Prerequisite: FREN 271 or permission of the instructor.

390.  Independent Study (I and II; R) Half to full course.
Subject to be selected by student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

395.  Seminar in French Studies (I and II; R; 3, 0)
Topics vary, but permit detailed study of any one of innumerable subjects in French literature and civilization. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

 

French, offered in Bucknell en France program in Tours only (FREN)

215.  Advanced Intermediate French I (I or II) Half to full course.
Intensive French language study during the student's first month in Tours. Offered only in Tours, required of all students their first semester there. Prerequisite: FREN 150.

216.  Advanced Intermediate French II (I and II) Half to full course.
Guided practice for the improvement of written and spoken French at the advanced intermediate level, and preparation for the DELF French proficiency exam. Offered only in Tours, required of all students their first semester there. Prerequisite: FREN 215.

217.  Advanced French I (II)
Intensive French language study during first month of second semester in Tours. Offered only in Tours. Prerequisite: FREN 215.

218.  Advanced French II (II; 3, 0) Half to full course.
Guided practice for the improvement of written and spoken French at the advanced intermediate level, and preparation for DELF French exam. Offered only in Tours. Prerequisite: FREN 216.

261.  Traduction (I or II; 3, 0)
Introduction to translation. Offered only in Tours. Prerequisite: FREN 150.

274.  The Art of Touraine (I; 3, 0) Half course.
This course will focus on the arts of the Touraine region. Offered only in Tours.

276.  Tours artistique (I and II; 2, 0) Half course.
The many faces of Tours as reflected in the arts. Offered only in Tours.

277.  La France au quotidien (II; 1, 1) Half course.
Introduction to the history and literary scene of the Touraine region. Offered only in Tours. Prerequisites: For second semester Bucknell en France students staying for a full year in Tours and who have taken FREN 276.

290.  Independent Study (I or II or S; 3, 0)
Independent study in French for students enrolled in the Bucknell en France program. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor and enrollment in the Bucknell en France program.

Course offered occasionally
262 Intercultural Communication

 

Hebrew (HEBR)

101A.  Intensive Elementary Hebrew (AII; 4, 0)
Intensive practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing modern Hebrew. Introduction to everyday Israeli culture. Not open to students who completed HEBR 101. Successful completion meets prerequisite for 103.

101.  Beginning Modern Hebrew (I; 3, 1)
Introduction to modern Hebrew. Practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing; elementary grammar and introduction to Israeli culture.

102.  Beginning Modern Hebrew II (II; 3, 1)
Continuation of modern Hebrew language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and introduction to Israeli culture. Prerequisite: HEBR 101 or equivalent. Not open to students who completed HEBR 101A.

103.  Intermediate Hebrew I (I; 3, 1)
A continuation and review of grammar emphasizing all four skills and culture. Prerequisite: HEBR 101A or HEBR 102 or equivalent.

104.  Intermediate Hebrew II (II; 3, 1)
Further review of grammar with emphasis on all four skills and culture. Prerequisite: HEBR 103 or equivalent.

150.  Topics in Jewish Studies (I or II; 3, 0)
Study of topics in Jewish cultures or societies.

215.  Hebrew Bible and Modern Literature (AI or AII; 3, 0)
The course examines how materials from the Hebrew Bible are reworked in modern literature and culture, focusing on Hebrew and American traditions. Crosslisted as HUMN 215.

236 .  Israel: Literature, Film, Culture (AII; 3, 0)
Course explores Israeli culture in its historical, ethnic, religious, linguistic, and geographical context through literature, film, political discourse, photography, and other texts. Crosslisted as UNIV 236.

251.  The Jewish Uprooted (AI or AII; 3, 0)
The course explores the figure of the uprooted in modern Jewish literature and culture, focusing on early 20th-century Hebrew, Yiddish, and Jewish-American writing (readings are in English).

 

Italian Studies (ITAL)

The Italian Studies program offers a major and a minor in Italian Studies. In addition to focusing on developing students’ fluency in Italian, students gain a broad understanding of Italy’s culture and its intellectual and artistic past. It is our goal to teach our students the linguistic skills and cultural knowledge necessary to successfully function in an Italian environment. Our students will also become familiar with Italy’s history, its artifacts and intellectual contributions of the past and present in order to understand Italy’s unique culture.

Residence abroad is the best way to gain proficiency in the language and knowledge of the culture. A semester or year abroad in Italy is strongly recommended and a variety of opportunities are available. Students wishing to study in Italy are encouraged to contact the coordinator of the Italian Studies program as early as possible in order to discuss the various options.

Italian Studies Major

The Italian Studies major targets the acquisition of the linguistic and cultural skills necessary to communicate at an advanced-low level in Italian. The major is intended to offer students access to the Italian culture, which has been vital to the development of our global society, and to assist them in developing a new perspective on our rapidly changing world. Italian Studies majors will also develop skills in writing, speaking and information literacy throughout their studies.

The major in Italian Studies requires seven courses (equivalent to seven full-credit courses) starting with ITAL 104 or above. It combines language proficiency, cultural knowledge, and a Culminating Experience. The specific requirements for each of these components are listed below.

Language Proficiency

Students majoring in Italian Studies will gain at least an advanced-low level of language proficiency in Italian (according to the ACTFL guidelines). The major in Italian Studies requires the completion of ITAL 205. This course concentrates also on the development of skills in writing, speaking and information literacy.

Cultural Knowledge

Students majoring in Italian Studies will gain familiarity with significant cultural aspects and artifacts of Italy. The major requires at least four courses related to Italy taught in Italian or English. It is strongly recommended that at least one of these content courses is taught in Italian. These courses are offered either by the Italian Studies program, by other programs or departments at Bucknell, or by an accepted study abroad program in Italy.

Culture courses at the 200 and 300 level offered by the Italian Studies program (in addition to ITAL 205) include ITAL 201-202 Intermediate Italian Conversation (half course, can each be counted only once towards the major), ITAL 230 Exploring Italian Studies (taught in Italian), ITAL 240 Love and Politics, ITAL 250 Introduction to Italian Cinema (taught either in Italian or English), ITAL 295 Topics in Italian Studies (taught either in Italian or English), ITAL 380 II Mezzogiorno: Culture of Southern Italy, ITAL 385 Corsets and Curses, ITAL 395 Advanced Topics in Italian Studies, ITAL 390 Independent Study (half to full-credit course).

Courses related to Italy offered by other programs or departments at Bucknell include ARTH 271 Italian Renaissance Art, ARTH 370 Kress Paintings Seminar, CLAS 132 Roman Civilization, CLAS 236 Age of Augustus, CLAS 243 Archaeology of Rome, HIST 246 Medieval Heresies and Heretics, LATN 101, LATN 102, LATN 151, LATN 221 (only one course in LATN can be counted), HUMN 310 Dante and Milton, and MUSC 267 Topics in Music History (Puccini).

Students may also choose courses in which half the content is Italian, such as a course on Italian and Flemish Baroque art, or on Renaissance history in Italy and Northern Europe. In such a case, a half-credit toward the major will be granted (i.e., two such courses would equal one Italian credit). In this case, any choices that students make as to field of personal research (such as for a term paper) will focus on the Italian part of the course. Such courses include: ARTH 102 World Art II: Renaissance to Enlightenment, HIST 237 The Renaissance, IREL 218 International Relations of Europe (with permission of the coordinator of the Italian Studies program), POLS 223 European Politics (with permission of the coordinator of the Italian Studies program).

Culminating Experience

The major in Italian Studies includes a Culminating Experience. The Culminating Experience draws together the skills, knowledge, and experiences a student gained during his/her studies of Italian language and culture. This Culminating Experience component of the major can be fulfilled during the student’s senior year in two ways:

  • Any 300-level course offered by the Italian Studies program (that has not been counted towards the cultural knowledge component). All writing requirements of the course must be completed in Italian.
  • An Independent Study resulting in a thesis or comparable product.

Study Abroad

Study abroad at a full immersion program is the best way of gaining proficiency in the language and knowledge of the culture. Students can count up to three credits towards the major (up to four if the student chooses to study abroad for a year) from a study abroad program approved by Bucknell’s Italian Studies program. These courses can be counted towards the language proficiency requirement as well as towards the cultural knowledge component of the major. ITAL 205 must be taken at Bucknell.

Italian Studies Minor

The minor in Italian Studies consists of a minimum of five course credits. ITAL 205 is required for the minor. The remaining four credits can be fulfilled according to the following options:

  • Students may choose courses from a list of courses taught at Bucknell whose content focuses on Italian language or culture.
  • Those students spending a semester in Italy can count two of the courses taken there towards their minor (or three, if they spend a year), after consultation with and approval of the coordinator of the Italian Studies minor.

Courses offered by the Italian Studies program that count towards the minor include all courses at the ITAL 102 level or above. One credit towards the minor will be granted for ITAL 101A. All additional courses counting towards the major can be counted towards the minor as well.

101A.  Intensive Elementary Italian (II; 4, 2) One and a half course.
Intensive practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Italian. Introduction to Italian culture. Successful completion meets the prerequisite for ITAL 103.

101.  Elementary Italian I (I and II; 4, 0)
Beginning language skills, practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing; elementary grammar; and introduction to Italian culture.

102.  Elementary Italian II (I or II; 4, 0)
Continuation of language skills. Practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Introduction to Italian culture. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent.

103.  Intermediate Italian I (I; 4, 0)
Review and expansion of language skills and cultural knowledge of Italy. Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or equivalent.

104.  Intermediate Italian II: Italian Civilization (II; 4, 0)
Continuing review of grammar emphasizing all four skills. Focus on civilization. Prerequisite: ITAL 103 or equivalent.

201.  202. Intermediate Italian Conversation I and II (I and II; R; 2, 0) Half courses.
Concentration on development of speaking skills. Conducted in Italian by native speaker. Each course can be counted only once toward the minor. Prerequisite or corequisite: ITAL 104 or equivalent.

205.  Discovering Italy (I; R; 3, 0)
Introduction to Italian culture. Intensive practice in speaking and writing Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 104 or equivalent.

230.  Exploring Italian Studies (II; 3, 0)
Examination of the major literary genres. Focus on developing a critical approach to the reading of texts. Prerequisite or corequisite: ITAL 104 or equivalent.

240.  Love and Politics (AI or AII; 3, 0)
Survey of major Italian writers from Middle Ages and Renaissance with reference to contemporary visual arts and music.

250.  Introduction to Italian Cinema (II; 3, 3)
Survey of Italian cinema from the silent era to the present. Discussion of major Italian cinematic movements and genres within the context of history, politics, and culture.

295.  Topics in Italian Studies (II; 3, 0)
Study of topics in Italian culture, literature, and/or civilization. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent.

380.  IL Mezzogiorno: Culture of Southern Italy (AI; 3, 3)
Study of the culture and society of southern Italy. Sources of inquiry include literature, film, and music. Prerequisite: ITAL 104.

385.  Corsets and Curses (AII; 3, 0)
This course aims at exploring the contributions of Italian women writers, musicians and filmmakers to Italian culture in different cities. It will take into account different time periods and will relate them to give a complete picture of Italian feminist thought. Prerequisite: ITAL 104.

390.  Independent Study (I or II; R) Half to full course.
Subject to be selected by student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

395.  Advanced Topics in Italian Studies (I; R; 3, 0)
Advanced study of themes or topics in Italian culture, literature and/or civilization.

 

Linguistics (LING)

Linguistics is the study of the human language faculty. It requires the investigation of a highly structured system of knowledge within the mind of the speaker (a mental grammar), which is examined empirically and modeled formally. Linguists seek to establish the general principles governing the organization, emergence, and use of language, including a model of how languages vary across space and time. Language is treated as a natural object, like other cognitive faculties, serving as a natural point of entry into scientific discovery and the tools of scientific reasoning, such as pattern recognition, experimental design, and hypothesis construction and testing. Linguistics serves as a "bridge" discipline between the sciences and the humanities, since language is at the center of humanistic inquiry, from philosophy and history to literary theory and language and cultural studies.

Linguistics Major

The major in linguistics includes a two-semester introductory sequence, intermediate work in theoretical grammar, intermediate work in the cognitive mechanisms of language, an advanced seminar, and two electives, as outlined below. Research opportunities are available within the major in the areas of language production and comprehension, language acquisition, and theoretical grammar.

The requirements for the major are as follows:

  • LING 105 and LING 110 (may be taken in any order)
  • Three 200-level courses, one of each pair: LING 205/206; LING 215/216; LING 225/230
  • At least one of the following seminars: LING 315, LING 330, or LING 340 (may count as a Culminating Experience)
  • Two electives: any of the linguistics courses listed in the Catalog may be taken, in addition to the following courses: PSYC 288 Applied Research Methods Seminar in Language, PSYC 315 Language Development, or SPAN 339 Spanish in the United States
  • A Culminating Experience

The Culminating Experience draws together and integrates the knowledge and analytical methods mastered by majors in the course of their study. It is satisfied by taking one seminar, either LING 315, LING 330, or LING 340, normally in the spring of the senior year. These 300-level seminars are designed to investigate one area in depth, while highlighting interactions between this area and other sub-disciplines studied in the course of the major.

Linguistics Minor

The linguistics minor consists of five courses. Both parts of the introductory sequence, LING 105 and LING 110, are required. The remaining three credits can be fulfilled by taking any linguistics courses on the 200- or 300-level.

105.  Linguistic Analysis: Sounds and Words (I or II; 3, 0)
One semester of a two-semester introduction to linguistics. Topics include: phonetics, phonology, word forms, language change, language acquisition. No prerequisite.

110.  Linguistic Analysis: Sentences and Dialects (I or II; 3, 0)
One semester of a two-semester introduction to linguistics. Topics include: syntax, semantics, language variation, language and society. No prerequisite.

205.  Phonetics and Phonology (AII; 3, 0)
An investigation into the articulatory and acoustic properties and patterns of speech sounds, with application to speech pathology, processing and phonological theory. Prerequisite: LING 105.

206.  Morphology (AI; 3, 0)
Explores the mental lexicon, the internal structure of words, and the processes by which words are formed in a wide variety of languages. Prerequisite: LING 105.

210.  Language and Race (AI or AII; 3, 0)
An introduction to "non-standard" dialects of English with a primary focus on African-American Vernacular English (AAVE or Ebonics). This course explores the linguistic and non-linguistic factors that give rise to language variation.

215.  Syntax (I; 3, 0)
Contemporary generative theory of phrase structure and its relation to meaning. Focus on comparative syntax and its implications for Universal Grammar. Prerequisite: LING 110 or permission of the instructor.

216.  Semantics (AI or AII; 3, 0)
An introduction to the fundamental notions, arguments, and techniques of linguistic semantics. Focus on how meaning is structured and represented by the human mind. Prerequisite: LING 110 or permission of the instructor.

225.  Language and the Brain (AI or AII; 3, 0)
An examination of the physical basis for language. Topics include the nature of language as a cognitive faculty, language evolution, language acquisition, atypical language development in childhood, and acquired aphasia.

230.  Psycholinguistics (II; 3, 0)
Analysis of psychological processes involved in language. Topics include language production and perception in children, adults, bilinguals, and exceptional populations.

241.  Teaching Foreign Language (II; 3, 0)
The objectives, materials, and methods of teaching foreign language skills. Prerequisites: LING 105 and a course in the structure of one foreign language.

295.  Topics in Linguistics (AI or AII; R; 3, 0)
A specific linguistic topic, to be selected. Prerequisite: LING 105 or LING 110 or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

315.  Advanced Syntax (AII; 3, 0)
Topics in advanced generative syntax, emphasis on new developments in syntactic theory. Prerequisite: LING 215.

319.  Undergraduate Research (I and II; R) Half to full course.
Research in psycholinguistics. Research topics may be posed by students or faculty. Prerequisite: LING 230 and permission of the instructor.

326.  Language and Cognition (II; 3, 0)
Advanced study of language perception, production, acquisition, evolution, computational models, and neural mechanisms. Focus on recent developments in the field. Crosslisted as PSYC 326. Prerequisite: a 200-level course from Cluster A in psychology or 200-level linguistics course.

330.  Advanced Topics in Psycholinguistics (AII; R; 3, 0)
Advanced study in psycholinguistics. Includes topics such as language production, language comprehension, and bilingualism. Prerequisite: LING 230 or permission of the instructor.

340.  Typology and Universals (AII; 3, 0)
Examination of the wide range of features in the world's languages. The course is mainly descriptive, with some theory regarding the source of linguistic universals. Prerequisite: one of the following:  LING 205, LING 206, LING 215, or LING 216.

390.  Independent Study (I and II; R) Half to full course.
Subject to be selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

 

Russian Studies (RUSS)

Studying Russian, the fifth most widely spoken language in the world, becomes especially important at the present time when Russia is becoming an essential partner in global politics, economy, and issues of the environment. By developing students' language skills and expanding their knowledge about Russian culture and society, the Russian Studies program strives to make students active participants in the multicultural, global community. Since Russian is one of the less-frequently taught languages, a major in Russian can become a unique and decisive factor in students' future careers in law, business, journalism, international affairs, and public and government services. The faculty of the Russian Studies program believes that even with a mastery of Russian grammar, real communication is still impossible unless students become familiar with Russian culture and society and the life experiences of Russians. For that reason the Russian Studies program offers courses in literature, culture, film, and Russian society (both in Russian and English).

All Russian language courses beyond RUSS 104 include assignments that are designed to develop students' writing and speaking skills. The "content" Russian language courses at the 200 and 300 level and courses on Russian culture and literature taught in English also help students to enhance their critical thinking and information literacy.

The major in Russian Studies consists of eight courses: five languages courses beyond RUSS 103, at least one of which has to be a 300-level seminar, and three courses on Russian literature/culture taught in English. RUSS 204 is encouraged as a complement to upper-level language courses, but neither RUSS 204 or RUSS 209 count towards the major requirement of five language courses beyond RUSS 103. The 300-level Russian language seminar will fulfill the College Core Curriculum Culminating Experience requirement. This requirement also can be fulfilled by an Honors Thesis in Russian.

The Russian Studies program offers four levels of Russian language study, striving to bring students to the intermediate high/advanced low level according to the ACTFL scale. This means that after graduation students are able to function effectively in Russian. Students majoring in Russian are strongly urged to deepen their knowledge of the language and country by studying in an approved summer or semester program in Russia.

The program offers two different minors: a minor in Russian language requires five Russian language courses; and a minor in Russian area studies requires five courses in the program, two of which may be Russian language courses. For both minors at least one of the five courses, taught in either Russian or English, must have a strong literature/culture component. Courses which fulfill this requirement are: RUSS 125, RUSS 222, RUSS 225, RUSS 230, RUSS 250, RUSS 252, RUSS 255, RUSS 301, RUSS 302, RUSS 311, RUSS 312, RUSS 315, RUSS 325, RUSS 340.

101A.  Intensive Elementary Russian (I or II; 3, 2)
Intensive training in speaking, reading, writing, and comprehending Russian. Fundamentals of grammar and popular culture.

101.  102. Elementary Russian I and II (I and II; 5)
Intensive training in speaking, reading, writing, and comprehending Russian. Fundamentals of grammar and popular culture. Prerequisite: RUSS 101 or equivalent is prerequisite for RUSS 102.

103.  104. Intermediate Russian I and II (I and II; 3, 1)
Advanced points of grammar and review of grammar. Training in all language skills combined with the study of cultural texts. Prerequisite: RUSS 102 or equivalent for RUSS 103; RUSS 103 is the prerequisite for RUSS 104.

125.  Topics in Russian Culture (I; R; 3, 0)
An examination of everyday life in Russia as a mirror of historical, ideological, sociological, and economic forces. In English.

150.  Russian History on Film (AI or AII; 3, 2)
Course examines differences between the actual and cinematic histories as they are reflected in Russian and American cinemas. In English.

201.  Advanced Russian I (I; 3, 0)
Advanced notions of Russian grammar; review of intermediate grammar. Advanced reading, composition, and conversation. In Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 104 or equivalent.

204.  Russian Conversation (I and II; R; 2) Half course.
Concentrated development of speaking skill. Conducted entirely in Russian by a native speaker. Intended for students enrolled in 200- and 300-level courses. This course cannot be taken more than twice.

205.  Russian for Business (AII; 3, 0)
Designed for proficiency in business communication skills. Studies the grammar and lexicology of commercial offers, orders, contracts, complaints, shipping, and delivery. In Russian.

209.  Russian Complementary Reading (I or II; R; 1, 0) Half course.
Russian sources read in conjunction with English language courses. Independent course of study established by instructor and student. Prerequisite: the equivalent of four semesters of Russian. This course cannot be taken more than twice.

222.  Russian Through Theater (I or II; 3, 0)
Advanced study of Russian language, particularly phonetics and intonation patterns through reading, discussion, and performing plays. In Russian.

225.  Russian Cinema: From Revolution to Repentance (I; 3, 0)
Traces through viewing and detailed analysis of films the development of Russian cinematography; from the innovations of directors like Eisenstein and Pudovkin, to the poetic-metaphorical aesthetics of Tarkovsky and Abuladze. In English.

230.  Russian Song: Poetry, Politics, Pop (II; 3, 0)
The role of song in Russian culture. Genres studied include art song, guitar poetry, contemporary pop and folk rock. In Russian.

250.  Crimes and Punishments: 19th-century Russian Literature (I; 3, 0)
Survey of major works of 19th-century Russian literature by Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov and their influence on Western European literary canon. In English.

252.  Russian Through Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
A study of Russian through literary works by contemporary Russian writers. In Russian.

255.  Politics of Writing: 20th-century Russian Literature (II; 3, 0)
Discussion of major trends and key literary figures in Russian literature from the 1917 Revolution to the post-Soviet Russia. Examines the questions of political dissent and literature vs. state. In English.

280.  Topics in the Slavic Languages (I and II; R) Half to full course.
Study of a Slavic language other than Russian. Languages may include Ukrainian, Polish, Czech, and Serbo-Croatian. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

295.  Topics in Russian Studies (AII; R; 3, 0)
Readings and discussion of special interest relevant to Russian studies. Topics selected by students in consultation with the instructor. In Russian.

301.  Nineteenth-century Russian Culture and Civilization (AI; 3, 0)
Cultural and ideological developments from Kievan Russia to 19th-century Russia: art and artistic trends in the context of historical events and everyday life. Extensive use of slides and video materials. For advanced students of Russian. In Russian.

302.  Twentieth-century Russian Culture and Civilization (AII; 3, 0)
Cultural developments from Chekhov to the present — the arts of the Silver Age, Socialist, realism, and post-Stalinism in the context of socio-political changes in 20th-century Russia. Extensive use of slides and video materials. For advanced students. In Russian.

311.  Readings in Russian Literature (I or II; 3, 0)
An advanced study of the Russian language through close reading and discussion of short works by major Russian writers. In Russian. Not open to students who have taken RUSS 252.

312.  Readings in Russian Poetry (AI or AII; 3, 0)
An advanced study of Russian through close reading and discussion of Russian poetry. In Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 201, RUSS 222, or RUSS 252. Not open to students who have taken RUSS 230.

315.  Global Manager in Russia (AI or AII; 3, 0) Half to full course.
The course is designed to prepare students in practical ways for their work in the global business environment and Russia in particular. In English.

325.  Dostoevsky and Tolstoy: Literary Philosophy (II; 3, 0)
An introduction to the major philosophical ideas of the great Russian writers Fyodor Dostoevsky and Leo Tolstoy. In English. Crosslisted as HUMN 325.

330.  Nabokov and His Worlds (AI or AII; 3, 0)
Major works of one of the greatest authors of the 20th century. Nabokov's Russian and American periods examined in the context of both literary traditions. In English.

340.  Russian Through Film and Theater (I or II; 3, 0)
An advanced study of Russian through watching and analyzing films and taped theatrical productions. In Russian.

350.  Advanced Topics in Russian (I or II; R; 3, 0) Half to full course.
Readings and discussion of special topics at an advanced level. Topics selected by instructor in consultation with students. Prerequisite: successful completion of 200-level course or equivalent.

390.  Independent Study (I or II; R; 3, 0) Half to full course.
Advanced independent research under the supervision of an instructor. Subject to be selected by student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

393.  Honors in Russian (I or II; R; 3, 0)

 

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