Bucknell University takes sexual misconduct very seriously and is dedicated to preventing and providing resources to those affected by sexual misconduct. National and Bucknell-specific surveys show that sexual violence is a problem both in society and on our campus.

Sexual Violence at Bucknell

The National College Health Assessment (NCHA), last administered in Spring 2011, provides the following information:

  • Bucknell students experience sexual touching without consent, attempted sexual penetration without their consent, sexual penetration without their consent, and sexually abusive intimate relationships.
  • Sexual violence may occur at higher rates at Bucknell than at other private baccalaureate schools in the Northeast or nationally.

The American College Health Association, which administers the NCHA survey, collects data from institutions across the country. The graph below shows how Bucknell University compares to other private baccalaureate schools in the Northeast and to national statistics. The graph represents the experiences of approximately 492 Bucknell undergraduate first year, sophomore, junior, and senior female students in the 12 months prior to the survey. These trends confirm the need for prevention education, such as that provided by Speak UP Bucknell.

 

National Data about Sexual Violence

National data also supports the need for sexual violence prevention education.

The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) includes data from English- and Spanish-speaking female and male adults living in the United States and asks respondents about victimization over their lifetime and in the 12 months prior to taking the survey. NISVS is not limited to college students.i

For 2010, the NISVS indicated that approximately 1.4% of men reported that they experienced rape at some point in their life; approximately 5.3% of men experienced other forms of sexual violence such as being made to penetrate someone else, sexual coercion, unwanted sexual contact, or non-contact unwanted sexual experiences in the prior 12 months to the survey.

Also in 2010, the NSIVS revealed that among adult women surveyed, American Indian/Alaskan Natives and non-Hispanic Black women experienced attempted or completed rape at higher rates than non-Hispanic white women.ii Of all women surveyed, 32.3% of lesbian and 58% of bisexual females experienced unwanted sexual contact compared to 25.9% of heterosexual females. Males surveyed reported that 32.8% of gay and 21.1% of bisexual males experienced unwanted sexual contact compared to 10.8% of heterosexual males.iii 

__________

iBlack, M.C., Basile, K.C., Breiding, M.J., Smith, S.G. Walters, M.L. Merrick, M.T., Chen, J., Stevens, M.R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

iiBlack, M.C., Basile, K.C., Breiding, M.J., Smith, S.G. Walters, M.L. Merrick, M.T., Chen, J., Stevens, M.R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

iiiWalters, M.L., Chen J., & Breiding, M.J. (2013) The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Findings on Victimization by Sexual Orientation. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Debunking Common Myths

Most rapes are perpetrated by strangers.

 FACT: Most rapes are actually perpetrated by individuals known to the victim. Approximately 90% of college women who are victims of sexual assault know the perpetrator.

False reports are common

 FACT: False reports of sexual assault are very rare. The incidence of false reports of sexual assault is similar to any other violent crime—around 2%. Furthermore, sexual assault is one of the most underreported crimes.

Victims of sexual assault shouldn't have put themselves in a "risky" situation.

 FACT: The perpetrators shouldn't have sexually assaulted the victim. Even if victims take all the necessary precautions to avoid "risky" situations, it is ultimately the perpetrators decision to engage in sexually violent behavior; therefore, the perpetrator should be held accountable for the sexual assault, not the victim.

All men are potential rapists.

 FACT: The majority of men are not sexually violent. Research shows that there is a small number of core offenders, who commit the vast majority of sexual assaults. These core offenders often commit 4-6 assaults before they are caught.

Close

Places I've Been

The following links are virtual breadcrumbs marking the 27 most recent pages you have visited in Bucknell.edu. If you want to remember a specific page forever click the pin in the top right corner and we will be sure not to replace it. Close this message.