CHIN 101. Chinese I. 1 Credit.
Offered Fall Semester Only; Lecture hours:3,Recitation:2
Intensive introduction to spoken and written "Mandarin" Chinese, the putonghua (common language) of modern China.

CHIN 102. Chinese I. 1 Credit.
Offered Spring Semester Only; Lecture hours:3,Recitation:2
Intensive introduction to spoken and written "Mandarin" Chinese, the putonghua (common language) of modern China. Prerequisite: CHIN 101.

CHIN 103. Second Year Chinese. 1 Credit
Offered Fall Semester Only; Lecture hours:3, Recitation:2
This is the first course of the Second-Year Chinese series. Students will learn vocabulary and sentence structures used in everyday situations through various forms of practice. In the latter half of the course, materials on cultural and socio-political issues will be introduced, to examine Chinese culture and society, and further prepare students for a higher level of Chinese learning. Prerequisite: CHIN 102 or equivalent.

CHIN 104 Second Year Chinese. 1 Credit
Offered Spring Semester Only; Lecture hours:3, Recitation:2
This is the second course of the Second-Year Chinese series. Through various forms of practice, students will learn vocabulary and sentence structures used not only in everyday situations, but also important to discuss cultural and socio-political issues. By comparing Chinese culture and life with their own, students will be able to discuss the similarities and differences in appropriate Chinese, and further prepare themselves for a higher level of Chinese learning. Prerequisite: CHIN 103 or equivalent.

CHIN 201. Chinese III. 1 Credit.
Offered Fall Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
Continued study of modern "Mandarin." Contemporary essays, movie scripts, short stories and newspaper articles. Equal emphasis on reading and speaking. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 104 or equivalent.

CHIN 202. Chinese III. 1 Credit.
Offered Spring Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
Continued study of modern "Mandarin." Contemporary essays, movie scripts, short stories and newspaper articles. Equal emphasis on reading and speaking. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 201 or equivalent.

CHIN 203. Chinese IV. 1 Credit.
Offered Fall Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
Reading and discussion of selected modern Chinese texts: newspaper and magazine articles, essays, short stories, and film scripts. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 202 or equivalent.

CHIN 204. Chinese IV. 1 Credit.
Offered Spring Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
Reading and discussion of selected modern Chinese texts: newspaper and magazine articles, essays, short stories, and film scripts. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 203 or equivalent.

DANC 263. Beyond Peking Opera: Art of Chinese Watersleeve.
Offered Fall Semester Only; Lecture hours: Varies, Other: 2
This course explores the rich heritage of traditional Chinese dance through the medium of Peking Opera's water sleeve technique.  This course strives to expand students' appreciation of various styles of Chinese traditional dance movement with an emphasis on developing technique skills, and will use the water sleeve technique abstracted from Chinese Peking Opera to cultivate the ability to create characters through movement quality. Students will learn fundamental technique and basic vocabulary. Students will have the ability to perform and collaborate with Western dance forms in a final culminating project.

EAST 111. East Asian Civilization. 1 Credit.
Offered Either Fall or Spring; Lecture hours:3
The development of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese civilizations highlighting their political, cultural, philosophical, and religious aspects from earliest times to the present.

EAST 120. Introduction to Chinese Culture. 1 Credit.
Offered Fall Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
This course is an introduction to Chinese culture from antiquity to the beginning of the twentieth century. We will primarily read canonical works of Chinese philosophy, religion, literature from ancient time to early twentieth century. Audio-visual media will be used to provide a glimpse of the splendor of Chinese fine arts. Our aim will be to thoroughly understand the selected works and map out the larger cultural and historical contours of imperial China that you can carry forward with you into subsequent courses in Chinese studies.

EAST 20X / HIST 203: Digital Methods in Chinese Studies
Offered Spring Semester Only; Lecture hours:1.5 Lab hours: 1.5
This course introduces students to digital tools and resources in Chinese studies. Topics include data mining, database design, and data visualization. It combines discussion of digitally empowered scholarship in Chinese studies and training in the technical know-how. Next offering: spring 2017.

EAST 213. Chinese Literature in Translation (Modern and Contemporary). 1 Credit.
Offered Spring semester; Lecture hours:3
This course is an introduction to Chinese literature in the twentieth century. We will read primarily fiction, although some drama, poetry, and film will also be included. Literary quality and technique are important considerations, but the social and political ideas of Chinese writers will be just as important. The course will be oriented not only around questions that feature literary practice in general but also prominent themes that have dominated modern and contemporary Chinese literary writing in particular: What are the functions of literature in a given society? What roles does literature play in a century of revolution, and how does literature respond to it? How does gender and sexuality participate in the development of modernity and the building of national identity? How does literature participate in the formation of urban life? In posing these questions, our aim will be to thoroughly understand the selected works of modern and contemporary Chinese literature and map out some of the larger cultural and historical contours of modern China.

EAST 228. China Through the Lens. 1 Credit.
Offered Spring Semester; Lecture hours:3
This course will primarily cover a history of cinema in mainland China, its origin and important periods, movements, and "generations," as well as representative cinemas of Taiwan and Hong Kong. Various genres of Chinese films will be studied from three perspectives: context of film productions, visual and narrative language of each film, and critical reception as well as spectatorship. In order to obtain a rich understanding of Chinese cinema, the examination of films will focus on a number of topics: Chinese cinema's changing pursuit of aesthetic values, its responses to political upheavals, its relationship to literary and cultural discourses, and its self-identification in a global context.

EAST 233 / HIST 293: China: Ancient Time to 18th Century
Offered Fall Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
Survey of Chinese history from the beginning of civilization to 1800. This course examines China's diverse and dynamic intellectual and religious traditions, the formation and transformation of the bureaucratic state, relationship between the state and the elites, and China's relationship with the outside world. We will also investigate China's transformations in the middle and late imperial period in all dimensions, out of which there emerged the philosophical persuasions, religious movements, and social and political institutions conventionally associated with "traditional" China.

EAST 234 / HIST 294: China Since 1800
Offered Fall Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
Survey of Chinese history from 1800 to the present. This course focuses especially on a) Chinese elite's changing responses to Western imperialism between 1840 and 1920s; b) the rise of party-states, mass politics, and the military in 20th-century China; c) the alternative trajectories of social, economic, political development on mainland China and Taiwan; and d) the profound social, economic, and political changes that engulfed China both sides of the Taiwan Strait in the past thirty years.

EAST 267 / HIST 297: The People's Republic of China
Offered Spring Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
In-depth exploration on the history of the People's Republic of China, with a particular focus on post-Mao era. Topics in this course include: a) political campaigns in Mao era; b) the Cultural Revolution; c) strategies of economic development and economic reforms; d) everyday life of ordinary Chinese such as migrant workers; e) changing strategies of political control and political protest; f) changing views of China's historical legacy; and g) ethnic relations and relations between the mainland and Taiwan.

ECON339-01 China and East Asian Economics
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the Chinese economy and China's role in the world economy. China's current economic challenges will be given particular attention. Topics that will be addressed include: the Chinese economy before 1949; the socialist era, 1949-1978; economic reform and market transition; the role of state enterprises; foreign investment; foreign trade; China's role in the East Asian trade-production network; the Chinese financial system; Chinese monetary and exchange rate policy; China's role in global imbalances; the internationalization of the Yuan; and does China have a housing bubble?

HUMN266/PHIL/266/EAST266: Chinese Philosophy
Seminar course. Covers: 1) classical philosophical schools and thinkers: Confucius, "Laozi," Mencius, Zhunagzi and Mozi; 2) Chinese Buddhist philosophy, including medieval Tiantai and Huayan schools; 3) the emergence and development of Chan Buddhist thought; 4) Neo-confucianism from Zhuxi to Wang Yangming; 5) Chinese philosophy since the Communist Revolution of 1949.

IREL 225. Chinese Politics. 1 Credit.
Offered Either Fall or Spring; Lecture hours:3
This course examines China's rich political history, its dynamic economic and social changes, its lasting political changes, its enduring struggle for modernization, and its evolving relations with the rest of the world. Crosslisted as EAST 269 and POLS 225.

IREL 226. East Asian Politics. 1 Credit.
Offered Spring Semester Only; Lecture hours:3
This course surveys history, politics, economy, and society of countries in East Asia. It investigates the continuity and change in politics and policies of China, Japan, Korea, and selected countries in Southeast Asia. Crosslisted as EAST 226 and POLS 226.

IREL 283. East Asian International Relations. 1 Credit.
Offered Either Fall or Spring; Lecture hours:3
This course offers an overview of international relations in East Asia, with focus on foreign policies of major states in the region as well as their political, economic, and social interactions. Crosslisted as EAST 248 and POLS 283.

IREL 482. U.S.-China Relations. 1 Credit.
Offered Either Fall or Spring; Lecture hours:3
Through tracing the evolution of U.S.-China relations from the 18th century to the 21st century, this course discusses major issues and challenges between the two countries today. Future trends of the bilateral relationship will also be explored. Prerequisite: POLS 170. Preference given to EAST, IREL, and POLS seniors. Crosslisted as EAST 382 and POLS 382.

RELI 115 - Introduction to Asian Religions
A comparative study of the basic teachings and practices of Asian religions through lectures, discussions, readings, and films; inquiry into similarities and differences.

RELI 200 - Buddhism
An interdisciplinary introduction to Buddhism, including basic teachings of liberation from suffering, impermanence, no-self, ethics, and meditation. Also explores the historical development of various streams of Buddhism in Asia and the West, with attention to the mutual influence between Buddhism and society, politics, and material culture. Crosslisted as EAST 251.

RELI 245 - Marketing Chinese Religions
Focus on the economic dimensions of Chinese religious institutions in modern and contemporary periods, with attention also paid to premodern precedents. Economics here indicates not only mechanisms of monetary exchange, but also negotiations of spiritual capital (ledgers of [de]merit) and of religious identities amidst rampant consumerism and commodification of sanctity. Crosslisted as EAST 252.

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