WEST BRANCH ASSOCIATE EDITORS, and HAPPY NEW EDITORIAL YEAR!

Thanks for dropping by! As by now you will have noticed, West Branch’s submission queue has reopened. We await your very best work. Surprise us? Delight us!

As we dive into a new editorial year, I want to take a few minutes to introduce our associate editors. Without them West Branch would not be the journal it is (and we certainly would not have the excellent response times we pride ourselves in having).

First, we say sad goodbyes to our two Associate Poetry Editors (and Stadler Fellows) from 2015-16: Chet’la Sebree and E.G. Means. As I type this, Chet’la is transitioning from a fellowship at the Vermont Studio Center to another at the Richard H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. We’re also excitedly awaiting Emily Goodman Means’s first collection, Natality, due out from Noemi Press in 2017.

We also say goodbye to the incomparable Jaquira Diaz, who served as one of our Associate Fiction Editors from 2013 to 2015. Jaquira follows two other WB associate editors to The Kenyon Review, where she’ll be a Kenyon Review Fellow for 2016-18.

Four of our Associate Fiction Editors continue to labor alongside me in the trenches of prose (Jessamine Chan and Cam Terwilliger are taking a break from their reading duties):

I will take this opportunity to congratulate Hasanthika on her excellent first collection, The Other One, which won the 2016 Juniper Prize for Fiction. Also congratulations to Bill, whose nonfiction book The Milan Miracle: The Town Hoosiers Left Behind is due out next month from Indiana University Press.

This month we welcome two new Stadler Fellows, one of whom will join West Branch as Associate Poetry Editor this fall. David Winter comes to us from Columbus, Ohio, where he earned an MFA and also served as poetry editor for The Journal. (Monica Sok, Bucknell’s other new Stadler Fellow, will be joining the West Branch staff in January.)

Part of the pleasure of working as Editor of West Branch is that managing editor Andrew Ciotola and I get to work with such extraordinary people every day. It’s a privilege.

Finally, if you haven’t checked out West Branch lately, we alert you to our most recent Wired issue, featuring fiction by Katherine Haake and Jenn Hollmeyer and new poets introduced by Camille Dungy. Our Spring/Summer 2016 print issue features poetry by Ali Stine and Rosalie Moffett, an essay by Eleanor Stanford, and a fantastic debut story by Josh Garfinkel. If you don’t subscribe, now’s the time.

  

—G.C. Waldrep, Editor

June 2015

Now that summer is here, the West Branch submissions queue is quiet, I want to take a moment to recognize the journal’s Contributing Editors. Various journals use their contributing editors in various ways. Here at West Branch, we’re glad to have them associated with our journal, and with the project of contemporary literature that journal represents. Some of them steer work our way by writers we might have missed; some of them also contribute micro-reviews for the Marginalia section of our print journal.

March 2015

I was planning to take a moment to recognize a rather lengthy slate of recent and forthcoming publications from our contributing, advisory, and associate fiction editors, who are wonderful on their own grounds, I mean beyond all they do for WB. But first, I want to crow a bit that this year West Branch will be featured in both Best American Short Stories (edited by T.C. Boyle) and Best American Poetry (edited by Sherman Alexie). Congratulations to Sarah Kokernot and Natalie Scenters-Zapico!

February 2015

I've always loved when (other) editors post lists of the topics they've seen far too much of, or (more rarely) not enough of. It's a guilty pleasure, if for no other reason than that I immediately embark upon a delightful thought experiment trying to stitch together as many proscripted elements as I can into a single story or poem of my own. But it's also a more serious reflection of one aspect of what we do as editors, what we have access to: an evolving, scintillating core sample of immersive culture. To work in an editorial queue is to see what's out there ... and to think about what's not.

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