September 05, 2005

LEWISBURG, Pa. — Author and award-winning journalist Paul Roberts will give the talk, "The End of Oil: Preparing for an Energy-challenged Future," Monday, Sept. 19, at 7:30 p.m. in Rooke Chapel (note location change) at Bucknell.

The talk, which is open to the public without charge, is the first event in the Social Science Colloquium series, "Sustainability: A 21st-century Perspective.

Roberts has been a journalist since 1983, writing and lecturing on the complex interplay of economics, technology and the natural world. The End of Oil is his first book.

A 2005 finalist for the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism, he also was a finalist for the National Magazine Award in 1999.

A columnist for Harper's Magazine and The Los Angeles Times, Roberts also has contributed articles to The Washington Post, Slate, USA Today, Newsweek, Rolling Stone and Outside magazine.

He appears regularly discussing energy issues and politics on national and international television and radio news shows including CNN's Lou Dobbs, the BBC, PBS NewsHour, MSNBC, CBS Evening News and on NPR's Morning Edition, On Point, Weekend Edition and Fresh Air.

"Roberts' talk will provide a fundamentally important perspective on global oil, the principal natural resource sustaining the world's industrial economies," said Peter Wilshusen, assistant professor of environmental studies at Bucknell. "High prices at the gas pump are just the beginning.

"Paul Roberts has written comprehensively not just about the `end of oil' but also about what alternative energy futures we might develop. "We are very fortunate to have him visit Bucknell to share his expertise with our community," he said.

While at Bucknell, Roberts also will participate in a Writers at Work discussion at noon in the Traditional Reading Room of the Bertrand Library, sponsored by the Writing Center.

Steve Stamos, professor of international relations at Bucknell and faculty coordinator for the Social Science Colloquium series, says, "For the past four decades, there has been an on-going analysis of the state of the world (planet) from an environmental and natural resource perspective.

"Certainly in a period when many experts believe that we are facing a serious global environmental crisis and pressures on non-renewable resources like petroleum, it is time to explore ways of producing and living that are sustainable," said Stamos.

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