1866

Bucknell Institute
Mattie Guffey

 

Bucknell University Archives 

1867

Katherine Brown graduates from the Bucknell Institute at the head of her class. She is immediately appointed as an instructor. In 1869, she becomes Katherine Larison, marrying Andrew B. Larison, M.D., of Ringoes, New Jersey. Dr. Larison and his brother establish a boarding and day school in 1870, known as the Seminary at Ringoes, where Mrs. Larison's husband's dies in 1872, Mrs. Larison assumes sole charge of the school until 1882 when she returns to Bucknell to succeed Principal Jones.

Theiss; Bucknell Mirror, 6/10/1897

1867

Female Institute
Class of 1867

 

University Archives  

1868

Women Fenced In 

"The women's campus was surrounded by a fence. In the rear of the grounds there was a high picket fence. Just insided the fence was a tall thick hedge. Whether this was put there to prevent the young ladies from seeing out, or the teachers from seeing through, is a question. At any rate, the young ladies used to get between the hedge and fence through which they communicated with the young men. "The streets of the town were very dark although they were, in places, lighted by gas. All the young ladies were required to go to prayer meeting in the evening. On the way home in the dark streets, many letters passed into the hands of the young men. "One oasis in the life of the seniors used to be the lectures on art given by the President on Thursday morning, at which the seniors of the Institute were present. These young ladies were expected to come up the hill while the men were in chapel. One Wednesday night, although it was cold and sleety; an ambitious young man climbed the roof and tied the bell which summoned the men to chapel, so that the next morning it could not be rung. The men refused to go into the chapel until the bell rang. They made a double line through which the Institute seniors were forced to pass and be inspected.

The Bucknellian

1868

Pictured among this group of faculty from the Female Institute are several individuals who have had noteworthy connections to Bucknell. In the front row on the left is Mary Hakes who later marries Leroy Stephens, an 1868 graduate of the University at Lewisburg. President Hill later nominates Mr. Stephens to the Board of Trustees and he serves at the same time as William Bucknell. This board is credited with saving the university during period of financial vulnerability. Mary Brown, front row right, married W. E. Martin, an graduate, who served as principal of the Bucknell Academy, a University professor, and college librarian. Mary's daughter Eliza J. Martin '00 will become the University's first woman librarian. In the top left of the photo is Katherine Brown, an 1867 graduate of the Institute. After being married and widowed, she returns in 1872 to become principal of the Female Institute. "Her memory is perpetuated in the name of the original Institute building now known as Larison Hall."

Theiss

1868

In 1837,Victoria Woodhull was born into a family of charlatans in Ohio. As a child, she was forced to perform in her father's traveling carnival show. At 15, she eloped with an alcoholic doctor to escape her father's brutality. Eventually her life's path would lead her to form alliances with such powerful men as Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, to become the first woman to own a Wall Street investment firm, to found her own newspaper, to speak before Congress demanding that women be given the vote and, finally, to run for U.S. President.

In 1868,from a lecture platform, Victoria boldly instructed women to demand a single sexual standard and not to accept the view that sexual desire in females is vulgar. "What! Vulgar!" she said. "This instinct that creates immortal souls vulgar? ...Be honest...it is not the possession of strong powers that is deprecated. They are that necessary part of human character."

In truth, she may have been a woman who lived a century before her time. The lessons she taught-to question, to be honest, to believe in your power, to value your mind and body, to fight for what is right - are lessons appropriate for every era.

Parade Magazine, 3/8/98

1869

Continued increase of students enrolling in the Female Institute results in the South Hall addition to the Seminary building, now known as Larison Hall. Twenty years later, the need for better facilities for teaching art and the growing demands of the school prompt Mr. William Bucknell to erect the Cottage, which is filled with students in September 1889. The Institute can then accommodate about 100 students. "It is beautifully located in a natural grove, and is a most commodious and comfortable building; arranged with a view to an abundant supply of light, sunshine, fresh air, and pure water. The halls are supplied with hot and cold water. Steam pipes and radiators heat every room. The drainage is faultless; stagnant water and dampness are impossible. The constant good health of the students bear testimony to the perfect sanitary conditions of this pleasant home school. "

Bucknell University Historical Sketch, University Archives

1871

Emma Marie Moir
1871 Female Institute Valedictorian

 

Bucknell University Archives 

1872

In this year, Victoria Woodhull ran for U.S. President against the popular incumbent, Ulysses S. Grant, and the powerful newspaperman Horace Greeley. She became the first woman to own a Wall Street investment firm, to found her own newspaper, and to speak before Congress demanding that women to be given the vote. Because Victoria Woodhull shocked and astounded and antagonized, a campaign was organized to bring her down. She was jailed repeatedly on charges of publishing pornography, and the press depicted her as "Mrs. Satan" and "The Prostitute Who Ran for President."

Parade Magazine, 3/8/98

1872

Class of 1872,
The Female Institute

Top row left to right: Hannah Hallowell, Sara Krigbaum, Hattie Stifler, Jerusha Campbell, Abbie Grier, Emma Kaufman

Second row: Annie Slifer, Mary Jones, Miss Bissell (teacher), Jennie Gerould, Lizzie Miller Bottom row: Annie Wilson, Sallie Fowler, Ella Young, Renie Moore, Lizzie Bell

Bucknell University Archives

1873

Anna Amelia Liddell graduates from the Female Institute. In 1874, she marries David Jayne Hill, whom she met as a freshman at the Institute. David Jayne Hill becomes fourth president of the University at Lewisburg in 1879. In 1880, after giving birth to Walter Liddell Hill in 1875 and Arthur Thompson Hill in 1878, Anna dies while giving birth to David Jayne Hill Jr., who also did not survive. Anna Liddell Hill lived from 1850 to 1880.

Bucknell University Archives 

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